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Impact of imported malaria on the burden of disease in northeastern Venezuela.
J Travel Med. 2006 Jan-Feb; 13(1):15-20.JT

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Many countries throughout the world are reporting an increasing number of imported malaria cases. It is now well documented that population movements play an important role in the spread and introduction of malaria infection in nonendemic areas.

METHODS

We evaluated the contribution of imported malaria to the overall malaria burden of disease in an already endemic malaria region in Venezuela, where malaria is exclusively caused by Plasmodium vivax. To estimate the magnitude of this contribution, we retrospectively analyzed cases of imported malaria in Sucre, Venezuela, during a 10-year period (1987-1998).

RESULTS

During this period, 1,755 (3.8% of the total) cases of imported malaria were identified. Most of these cases were imported from the Meridian states into Sucre. In Latin America, a major factor in the reemergence and spread of malaria is human migration. Surveillance of imported cases of malaria in Venezuela would allow us to continue evaluating population migration dynamics and its epidemiologic impact on malaria transmission.

CONCLUSION

Enhanced surveillance, such as the one shown in this study, would help the early identification of nonindigenous Plasmodium species and also of resistant Plasmodium strains with a potential to spread locally. Population mobility and imported malaria cases may add to the magnitude of malaria burden in some regions of Latin America. Furthermore, malaria treatment guidelines at local and national levels need to incorporate imported malaria cases in their treatment algorithms and into chemoprophylactic recommendations for travelers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centro Trujillano de Investigaciones Parasitológicas José Witremundo Torrealba, Núcleo Universitario Rafael Rangel, Universidad de Los Andes, Trujillo, Venezuela.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16412105

Citation

Rodríguez-Morales, Alfonso J., et al. "Impact of Imported Malaria On the Burden of Disease in Northeastern Venezuela." Journal of Travel Medicine, vol. 13, no. 1, 2006, pp. 15-20.
Rodríguez-Morales AJ, Delgado L, Martínez N, et al. Impact of imported malaria on the burden of disease in northeastern Venezuela. J Travel Med. 2006;13(1):15-20.
Rodríguez-Morales, A. J., Delgado, L., Martínez, N., & Franco-Paredes, C. (2006). Impact of imported malaria on the burden of disease in northeastern Venezuela. Journal of Travel Medicine, 13(1), 15-20.
Rodríguez-Morales AJ, et al. Impact of Imported Malaria On the Burden of Disease in Northeastern Venezuela. J Travel Med. 2006 Jan-Feb;13(1):15-20. PubMed PMID: 16412105.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of imported malaria on the burden of disease in northeastern Venezuela. AU - Rodríguez-Morales,Alfonso J, AU - Delgado,Laura, AU - Martínez,Nestor, AU - Franco-Paredes,Carlos, PY - 2006/1/18/pubmed PY - 2006/5/10/medline PY - 2006/1/18/entrez SP - 15 EP - 20 JF - Journal of travel medicine JO - J Travel Med VL - 13 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Many countries throughout the world are reporting an increasing number of imported malaria cases. It is now well documented that population movements play an important role in the spread and introduction of malaria infection in nonendemic areas. METHODS: We evaluated the contribution of imported malaria to the overall malaria burden of disease in an already endemic malaria region in Venezuela, where malaria is exclusively caused by Plasmodium vivax. To estimate the magnitude of this contribution, we retrospectively analyzed cases of imported malaria in Sucre, Venezuela, during a 10-year period (1987-1998). RESULTS: During this period, 1,755 (3.8% of the total) cases of imported malaria were identified. Most of these cases were imported from the Meridian states into Sucre. In Latin America, a major factor in the reemergence and spread of malaria is human migration. Surveillance of imported cases of malaria in Venezuela would allow us to continue evaluating population migration dynamics and its epidemiologic impact on malaria transmission. CONCLUSION: Enhanced surveillance, such as the one shown in this study, would help the early identification of nonindigenous Plasmodium species and also of resistant Plasmodium strains with a potential to spread locally. Population mobility and imported malaria cases may add to the magnitude of malaria burden in some regions of Latin America. Furthermore, malaria treatment guidelines at local and national levels need to incorporate imported malaria cases in their treatment algorithms and into chemoprophylactic recommendations for travelers. SN - 1195-1982 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16412105/Impact_of_imported_malaria_on_the_burden_of_disease_in_northeastern_Venezuela_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jtm/article-lookup/doi/10.1111/j.1708-8305.2006.00006.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -