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Magnetic resonance imaging findings in the brains of rabbits infected with Angiostrongylus cantonensis: a long-term investigation.
J Parasitol. 2005 Oct; 91(5):1237-9.JP

Abstract

Because magnetic resonance (MRI) imaging is a superior technique in delineating pathological changes in cerebral angiostrongyliasis, it should also be an optimal imaging modality in monitoring long-term changes in the brains of animals infected with Angiostrongylus cantonensis. In this study, MRI and histological techniques were used to observe the changes in the brains of 7 rabbits infected with the third-stage larvae of A. canronensis. Changes were monitored by MRI from day 0 to day 207 postinfection (PI). Hyperintense lesions on T2-weighted MR brain images were first observed on day 22 PI and hallmarks of abnormalities were noted on day 35 PI. Hyperintensities on brain MR images remained up to day 207 PI. Histological examination from days 108 to 207 PI revealed meningeal congestion, choroid plexus inflammation, infarction, granuloma with embedded larva, gliosis, and hemorrhage in the brain tissues. These findings suggest that hosts infected with A. cantonensis may undergo pathological changes in the brain tissues for more than 200 days PI. Moreover, severe abnormalities may occur as early as the fifth week PI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Parasitology, College of Medicine, Chang-Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16419780

Citation

Wang, Lian-Chen, et al. "Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in the Brains of Rabbits Infected With Angiostrongylus Cantonensis: a Long-term Investigation." The Journal of Parasitology, vol. 91, no. 5, 2005, pp. 1237-9.
Wang LC, Wan DP, Jung SM, et al. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in the brains of rabbits infected with Angiostrongylus cantonensis: a long-term investigation. J Parasitol. 2005;91(5):1237-9.
Wang, L. C., Wan, D. P., Jung, S. M., Chen, C. C., Wong, H. F., & Wan, Y. L. (2005). Magnetic resonance imaging findings in the brains of rabbits infected with Angiostrongylus cantonensis: a long-term investigation. The Journal of Parasitology, 91(5), 1237-9.
Wang LC, et al. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in the Brains of Rabbits Infected With Angiostrongylus Cantonensis: a Long-term Investigation. J Parasitol. 2005;91(5):1237-9. PubMed PMID: 16419780.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Magnetic resonance imaging findings in the brains of rabbits infected with Angiostrongylus cantonensis: a long-term investigation. AU - Wang,Lian-Chen, AU - Wan,Dinah-Pingni, AU - Jung,Shih-Ming, AU - Chen,Chien-Chuan, AU - Wong,Ho-Fai, AU - Wan,Yung-Liang, PY - 2006/1/20/pubmed PY - 2006/1/31/medline PY - 2006/1/20/entrez SP - 1237 EP - 9 JF - The Journal of parasitology JO - J Parasitol VL - 91 IS - 5 N2 - Because magnetic resonance (MRI) imaging is a superior technique in delineating pathological changes in cerebral angiostrongyliasis, it should also be an optimal imaging modality in monitoring long-term changes in the brains of animals infected with Angiostrongylus cantonensis. In this study, MRI and histological techniques were used to observe the changes in the brains of 7 rabbits infected with the third-stage larvae of A. canronensis. Changes were monitored by MRI from day 0 to day 207 postinfection (PI). Hyperintense lesions on T2-weighted MR brain images were first observed on day 22 PI and hallmarks of abnormalities were noted on day 35 PI. Hyperintensities on brain MR images remained up to day 207 PI. Histological examination from days 108 to 207 PI revealed meningeal congestion, choroid plexus inflammation, infarction, granuloma with embedded larva, gliosis, and hemorrhage in the brain tissues. These findings suggest that hosts infected with A. cantonensis may undergo pathological changes in the brain tissues for more than 200 days PI. Moreover, severe abnormalities may occur as early as the fifth week PI. SN - 0022-3395 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16419780/Magnetic_resonance_imaging_findings_in_the_brains_of_rabbits_infected_with_Angiostrongylus_cantonensis:_a_long_term_investigation_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1645/GE-450R1.1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -