Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Publication bias in foodborne outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease and its implications for evidence-based food policy. England and Wales 1992-2003.
Epidemiol Infect. 2006 Aug; 134(4):667-74.EI

Abstract

Systematic national surveillance of outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease (IID) was introduced in England and Wales in 1992 to provide comprehensive information on causative organisms, sources or vehicles of infection and modes of transmission. We compared information from this system with that published in the peer-reviewed literature between 1 January 1992 and 31 January 2003 to assess the potential effect of publication bias on food-safety policy. During the study period 1763 foodborne outbreaks of IID were reported to national surveillance. Fifty-five were published in the peer-reviewed literature. The peer-reviewed literature overestimated the impacts of milk/milk products, miscellaneous foods (e.g. sandwiches) and desserts and underestimated those of poultry, fish and shellfish, red meat/meat products and eggs/egg products. Without systematic surveillance, knowledge of causative organisms, sources or vehicles of infection and modes of transmission, as gleaned from the peer-reviewed literature, would potentially distort food-safety policy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Medicine and Neurosciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. Sarah.O'Brien@manchester.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16420723

Citation

O'Brien, S J., et al. "Publication Bias in Foodborne Outbreaks of Infectious Intestinal Disease and Its Implications for Evidence-based Food Policy. England and Wales 1992-2003." Epidemiology and Infection, vol. 134, no. 4, 2006, pp. 667-74.
O'Brien SJ, Gillespie IA, Sivanesan MA, et al. Publication bias in foodborne outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease and its implications for evidence-based food policy. England and Wales 1992-2003. Epidemiol Infect. 2006;134(4):667-74.
O'Brien, S. J., Gillespie, I. A., Sivanesan, M. A., Elson, R., Hughes, C., & Adak, G. K. (2006). Publication bias in foodborne outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease and its implications for evidence-based food policy. England and Wales 1992-2003. Epidemiology and Infection, 134(4), 667-74.
O'Brien SJ, et al. Publication Bias in Foodborne Outbreaks of Infectious Intestinal Disease and Its Implications for Evidence-based Food Policy. England and Wales 1992-2003. Epidemiol Infect. 2006;134(4):667-74. PubMed PMID: 16420723.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Publication bias in foodborne outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease and its implications for evidence-based food policy. England and Wales 1992-2003. AU - O'Brien,S J, AU - Gillespie,I A, AU - Sivanesan,M A, AU - Elson,R, AU - Hughes,C, AU - Adak,G K, Y1 - 2006/01/18/ PY - 2005/11/08/accepted PY - 2006/1/20/pubmed PY - 2006/9/1/medline PY - 2006/1/20/entrez SP - 667 EP - 74 JF - Epidemiology and infection JO - Epidemiol Infect VL - 134 IS - 4 N2 - Systematic national surveillance of outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease (IID) was introduced in England and Wales in 1992 to provide comprehensive information on causative organisms, sources or vehicles of infection and modes of transmission. We compared information from this system with that published in the peer-reviewed literature between 1 January 1992 and 31 January 2003 to assess the potential effect of publication bias on food-safety policy. During the study period 1763 foodborne outbreaks of IID were reported to national surveillance. Fifty-five were published in the peer-reviewed literature. The peer-reviewed literature overestimated the impacts of milk/milk products, miscellaneous foods (e.g. sandwiches) and desserts and underestimated those of poultry, fish and shellfish, red meat/meat products and eggs/egg products. Without systematic surveillance, knowledge of causative organisms, sources or vehicles of infection and modes of transmission, as gleaned from the peer-reviewed literature, would potentially distort food-safety policy. SN - 0950-2688 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16420723/Publication_bias_in_foodborne_outbreaks_of_infectious_intestinal_disease_and_its_implications_for_evidence_based_food_policy__England_and_Wales_1992_2003_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0950268805005765/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -