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Airborne occupational exposures and risk of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma.
Occup Environ Med. 2006 Feb; 63(2):107-12.OE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The reasons for the increasing incidence of and strong male predominance in patients with oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma remain unclear. The authors hypothesised that airborne occupational exposures in male dominated industries might contribute.

METHODS

In a nationwide Swedish population based case control study, 189 and 262 cases of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma respectively, 167 cases of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and 820 frequency matched controls underwent personal interviews. Based on each study participant's lifetime occupational history the authors assessed cumulative airborne occupational exposure for 10 agents, analysed individually and combined, by a deterministic additive model including probability, frequency, and intensity. Furthermore, occupations and industries of longest duration were analysed. Relative risks were estimated by odds ratios (OR), with 95% confidence intervals (CI), using conditional logistic regression, adjusted for potential confounders.

RESULTS

Tendencies of positive associations were found between high exposure to pesticides and risk of oesophageal (OR 2.3 (95% CI 0.9 to 5.7)) and cardia adenocarcinoma (OR 2.1 (95% CI 1.0 to 4.6)). Among workers highly exposed to particular agents, a tendency of an increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma was found. There was a twofold increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma among concrete and construction workers (OR 2.2 (95% CI 1.1 to 4.2)) and a nearly fourfold increased risk of cardia adenocarcinoma among workers within the motor vehicle industry (OR 3.9 (95% CI 1.5 to 10.4)). An increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OR 3.9 (95% CI 1.2 to 12.5)), and a tendency of an increased risk of cardia adenocarcinoma (OR 2.8 (95% CI 0.9 to 8.5)), were identified among hotel and restaurant workers.

CONCLUSIONS

Specific airborne occupational exposures do not seem to be of major importance in the aetiology of oesophageal or cardia adenocarcinoma and are unlikely to contribute to the increasing incidence or the male predominance.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Catarina.Jansson@meb.ki.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16421388

Citation

Jansson, C, et al. "Airborne Occupational Exposures and Risk of Oesophageal and Cardia Adenocarcinoma." Occupational and Environmental Medicine, vol. 63, no. 2, 2006, pp. 107-12.
Jansson C, Plato N, Johansson AL, et al. Airborne occupational exposures and risk of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma. Occup Environ Med. 2006;63(2):107-12.
Jansson, C., Plato, N., Johansson, A. L., Nyrén, O., & Lagergren, J. (2006). Airborne occupational exposures and risk of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 63(2), 107-12.
Jansson C, et al. Airborne Occupational Exposures and Risk of Oesophageal and Cardia Adenocarcinoma. Occup Environ Med. 2006;63(2):107-12. PubMed PMID: 16421388.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Airborne occupational exposures and risk of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma. AU - Jansson,C, AU - Plato,N, AU - Johansson,A L V, AU - Nyrén,O, AU - Lagergren,J, PY - 2006/1/20/pubmed PY - 2006/2/1/medline PY - 2006/1/20/entrez SP - 107 EP - 12 JF - Occupational and environmental medicine JO - Occup Environ Med VL - 63 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: The reasons for the increasing incidence of and strong male predominance in patients with oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma remain unclear. The authors hypothesised that airborne occupational exposures in male dominated industries might contribute. METHODS: In a nationwide Swedish population based case control study, 189 and 262 cases of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma respectively, 167 cases of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and 820 frequency matched controls underwent personal interviews. Based on each study participant's lifetime occupational history the authors assessed cumulative airborne occupational exposure for 10 agents, analysed individually and combined, by a deterministic additive model including probability, frequency, and intensity. Furthermore, occupations and industries of longest duration were analysed. Relative risks were estimated by odds ratios (OR), with 95% confidence intervals (CI), using conditional logistic regression, adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: Tendencies of positive associations were found between high exposure to pesticides and risk of oesophageal (OR 2.3 (95% CI 0.9 to 5.7)) and cardia adenocarcinoma (OR 2.1 (95% CI 1.0 to 4.6)). Among workers highly exposed to particular agents, a tendency of an increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma was found. There was a twofold increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma among concrete and construction workers (OR 2.2 (95% CI 1.1 to 4.2)) and a nearly fourfold increased risk of cardia adenocarcinoma among workers within the motor vehicle industry (OR 3.9 (95% CI 1.5 to 10.4)). An increased risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OR 3.9 (95% CI 1.2 to 12.5)), and a tendency of an increased risk of cardia adenocarcinoma (OR 2.8 (95% CI 0.9 to 8.5)), were identified among hotel and restaurant workers. CONCLUSIONS: Specific airborne occupational exposures do not seem to be of major importance in the aetiology of oesophageal or cardia adenocarcinoma and are unlikely to contribute to the increasing incidence or the male predominance. SN - 1470-7926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16421388/Airborne_occupational_exposures_and_risk_of_oesophageal_and_cardia_adenocarcinoma_ L2 - https://oem.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=16421388 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -