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Transition into daylight saving time influences the fragmentation of the rest-activity cycle.
J Circadian Rhythms. 2006 Jan 19; 4:1.JC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Daylight saving time is widely adopted. Little is known about its influence on the daily rest-activity cycles. We decided to explore the effects of transition into daylight saving time on the circadian rhythm of activity.

METHODS

We monitored the rest-activity cycles with the use of wrist-worn accelerometer on a sample of ten healthy adults for ten days around the transition into summer time. Identical protocols were carried out on the same individuals in two consecutive years, yielding data on 200 person-days for analysis in this study.

RESULTS

There was no significant effect on the rest-activity cycle in the sample as a whole. Fragmentation of the rest-activity cycle was enhanced in a subgroup of persons having sleep for eight hours or less (P = 0.04) but reduced in those who preferred to sleep for more than eight hours per night (P = 0.05). The average level of motor activity was increased in persons having the morning preference for daily activity patterns (P = 0.01).

CONCLUSION

Transition into daylight saving time may have a disruptive effect on the rest-activity cycle in those healthy adults who are short-sleepers or more of the evening type.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Mental Health and Alcohol Research, National Public Health Institute, Mannerheimintie 166, FI-00300 Helsinki, Finland. timo.partonen@ktl.fi.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16423282

Citation

Lahti, Tuuli A., et al. "Transition Into Daylight Saving Time Influences the Fragmentation of the Rest-activity Cycle." Journal of Circadian Rhythms, vol. 4, 2006, p. 1.
Lahti TA, Leppämäki S, Ojanen SM, et al. Transition into daylight saving time influences the fragmentation of the rest-activity cycle. J Circadian Rhythms. 2006;4:1.
Lahti, T. A., Leppämäki, S., Ojanen, S. M., Haukka, J., Tuulio-Henriksson, A., Lönnqvist, J., & Partonen, T. (2006). Transition into daylight saving time influences the fragmentation of the rest-activity cycle. Journal of Circadian Rhythms, 4, 1.
Lahti TA, et al. Transition Into Daylight Saving Time Influences the Fragmentation of the Rest-activity Cycle. J Circadian Rhythms. 2006 Jan 19;4:1. PubMed PMID: 16423282.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Transition into daylight saving time influences the fragmentation of the rest-activity cycle. AU - Lahti,Tuuli A, AU - Leppämäki,Sami, AU - Ojanen,Sanna-Maria, AU - Haukka,Jari, AU - Tuulio-Henriksson,Annamari, AU - Lönnqvist,Jouko, AU - Partonen,Timo, Y1 - 2006/01/19/ PY - 2005/08/01/received PY - 2006/01/19/accepted PY - 2006/1/21/pubmed PY - 2006/1/21/medline PY - 2006/1/21/entrez SP - 1 EP - 1 JF - Journal of circadian rhythms JO - J Circadian Rhythms VL - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Daylight saving time is widely adopted. Little is known about its influence on the daily rest-activity cycles. We decided to explore the effects of transition into daylight saving time on the circadian rhythm of activity. METHODS: We monitored the rest-activity cycles with the use of wrist-worn accelerometer on a sample of ten healthy adults for ten days around the transition into summer time. Identical protocols were carried out on the same individuals in two consecutive years, yielding data on 200 person-days for analysis in this study. RESULTS: There was no significant effect on the rest-activity cycle in the sample as a whole. Fragmentation of the rest-activity cycle was enhanced in a subgroup of persons having sleep for eight hours or less (P = 0.04) but reduced in those who preferred to sleep for more than eight hours per night (P = 0.05). The average level of motor activity was increased in persons having the morning preference for daily activity patterns (P = 0.01). CONCLUSION: Transition into daylight saving time may have a disruptive effect on the rest-activity cycle in those healthy adults who are short-sleepers or more of the evening type. SN - 1740-3391 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16423282/Transition_into_daylight_saving_time_influences_the_fragmentation_of_the_rest_activity_cycle_ L2 - https://www.jcircadianrhythms.com/articles/10.1186/1740-3391-4-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -