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Atopy, eczema and breast milk fatty acids in a high-risk cohort of children followed from birth to 5 yr.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2006 Feb; 17(1):4-10.PA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The incidence of atopic diseases such as eczema is increasing in westernized societies. The suggestion that there is a "protective" association between the unique fatty acid composition of breast milk, particularly the omega-3 (n-3) and omega-6 (n-6) essential polyunsaturated fatty acid content, and the development of atopic disease in children was investigated in a cohort study of 263 infants born into families with a history of allergy (one or both parents had asthma, hayfever, eczema). The objectives of this study were to determine the lipid profile [specifically in relation to long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) composition] in maternal breast milk samples collected at 6 wk and at 6 months following birth, and to investigate the potential role of these fatty acids in modulating the phenotype of children at high genetic risk of developing atopic disease.

METHOD

Breast milk samples were available from 91 atopic mothers at their child's ages of 6 wk and 6 months. These samples were analysed for the fatty acid spectrum. Analysis of variance was used to detect differences between groups of outcomes (no atopy or eczema, non-atopic eczema, atopy, atopic eczema) at ages 6 months and 5 yr, and a multiple comparisons procedure was conducted to isolate the parameters producing the different results (F-test, LSD test). For the exposure variables, n-3 and n-6 fatty acids are expressed as weight percentage and as a ratio (at both time-points).

RESULTS

The fatty acid profiles of maternal breast milk at 6 wk and 6 months were similar. An increased ratio of n-6: n-3 fatty acids in both 6 wk and 6 month milk samples was associated with non-atopic eczema (p < 0.005) but not atopy alone or atopic eczema.

CONCLUSION

We found milk fatty acids were a significant modulator of non-atopic eczema but not atopy or atopic eczema in infants at 6 months. In mothers with a history of asthma, hayfever or eczema, their 6-month-old infants were more likely to develop non-atopic eczema if their milk had a higher ratio of n-6: n-3 LC-PUFA.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, Centre for Child Health Research, University of Western Australia, PO Box 855, West Perth, Perth, WA, Australia. wendyo@ichr.uwa.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16426248

Citation

Oddy, Wendy H., et al. "Atopy, Eczema and Breast Milk Fatty Acids in a High-risk Cohort of Children Followed From Birth to 5 Yr." Pediatric Allergy and Immunology : Official Publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, vol. 17, no. 1, 2006, pp. 4-10.
Oddy WH, Pal S, Kusel MM, et al. Atopy, eczema and breast milk fatty acids in a high-risk cohort of children followed from birth to 5 yr. Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2006;17(1):4-10.
Oddy, W. H., Pal, S., Kusel, M. M., Vine, D., de Klerk, N. H., Hartmann, P., Holt, P. G., Sly, P. D., Burton, P. R., Stanley, F. J., & Landau, L. I. (2006). Atopy, eczema and breast milk fatty acids in a high-risk cohort of children followed from birth to 5 yr. Pediatric Allergy and Immunology : Official Publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 17(1), 4-10.
Oddy WH, et al. Atopy, Eczema and Breast Milk Fatty Acids in a High-risk Cohort of Children Followed From Birth to 5 Yr. Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2006;17(1):4-10. PubMed PMID: 16426248.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Atopy, eczema and breast milk fatty acids in a high-risk cohort of children followed from birth to 5 yr. AU - Oddy,Wendy H, AU - Pal,Sebely, AU - Kusel,Merci M H, AU - Vine,Donna, AU - de Klerk,Nicholas H, AU - Hartmann,Peter, AU - Holt,Patrick G, AU - Sly,Peter D, AU - Burton,Paul R, AU - Stanley,Fiona J, AU - Landau,Louis I, PY - 2006/1/24/pubmed PY - 2006/8/15/medline PY - 2006/1/24/entrez SP - 4 EP - 10 JF - Pediatric allergy and immunology : official publication of the European Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology JO - Pediatr Allergy Immunol VL - 17 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: The incidence of atopic diseases such as eczema is increasing in westernized societies. The suggestion that there is a "protective" association between the unique fatty acid composition of breast milk, particularly the omega-3 (n-3) and omega-6 (n-6) essential polyunsaturated fatty acid content, and the development of atopic disease in children was investigated in a cohort study of 263 infants born into families with a history of allergy (one or both parents had asthma, hayfever, eczema). The objectives of this study were to determine the lipid profile [specifically in relation to long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) composition] in maternal breast milk samples collected at 6 wk and at 6 months following birth, and to investigate the potential role of these fatty acids in modulating the phenotype of children at high genetic risk of developing atopic disease. METHOD: Breast milk samples were available from 91 atopic mothers at their child's ages of 6 wk and 6 months. These samples were analysed for the fatty acid spectrum. Analysis of variance was used to detect differences between groups of outcomes (no atopy or eczema, non-atopic eczema, atopy, atopic eczema) at ages 6 months and 5 yr, and a multiple comparisons procedure was conducted to isolate the parameters producing the different results (F-test, LSD test). For the exposure variables, n-3 and n-6 fatty acids are expressed as weight percentage and as a ratio (at both time-points). RESULTS: The fatty acid profiles of maternal breast milk at 6 wk and 6 months were similar. An increased ratio of n-6: n-3 fatty acids in both 6 wk and 6 month milk samples was associated with non-atopic eczema (p < 0.005) but not atopy alone or atopic eczema. CONCLUSION: We found milk fatty acids were a significant modulator of non-atopic eczema but not atopy or atopic eczema in infants at 6 months. In mothers with a history of asthma, hayfever or eczema, their 6-month-old infants were more likely to develop non-atopic eczema if their milk had a higher ratio of n-6: n-3 LC-PUFA. SN - 0905-6157 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16426248/Atopy_eczema_and_breast_milk_fatty_acids_in_a_high_risk_cohort_of_children_followed_from_birth_to_5_yr_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-3038.2005.00340.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -