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Effect of low altitude at the Dead Sea on exercise capacity and cardiopulmonary response to exercise in cystic fibrosis patients with moderate to severe lung disease.
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2006 Mar; 41(3):234-41.PP

Abstract

Oxygen supplementation may improve exercise tolerance and the physiological response to exercise in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Elevated barometric pressure at low altitude is a simple means of increasing the quantity of inspired oxygen. Our objectives were to examine the effect of natural oxygen enrichment (at the Dead Sea, 396 m below sea level) on exercise capacity, and the physiological responses to maximal and submaximal exercise in CF patients. Patients were tested twice: at sea level (barometric pressure, 754 +/- 6 mmHg, mean +/- SD), and at the Dead Sea (barometric pressure, 791 +/- 3 mmHg), in a randomized crossover design. We studied 14 CF patients (6 females, 8 males), aged 15-45 years, with moderate to severe lung disease (mean forced expired volume in 1 sec = 50.0 +/- 11.2% predicted). Tests at each site included resting spirometry, anthropometry, a graded submaximal exercise test, a maximal exercise test on a treadmill, and a 6-min walk test. Tests were performed in identical order at both sites. Tests at the Dead Sea were performed 72 hr after arrival. No differences between sites were observed in lung function at rest. Peak oxygen consumption was significantly improved at the Dead Sea compared with sea level (1.68 +/- 0.73 vs. 1.57 +/- 0.74 l/min, respectively, P = 0.05), along with an improvement in the ventilatory equivalent for oxygen (41.2 +/- 6.3 vs. 46.1 +/- 7.1, respectively, P < 0.05). During submaximal exercise, blood oxygen saturation improved at the Dead Sea compared with sea level at all exercise intensities (P < 0.05). In conclusion, these results suggest that even a brief stay at the Dead Sea area may have physiological benefits for CF patients with moderate to severe lung disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Ribstein Center for Sport Medicine Sciences and Research, Wingate Institute, Israel. bareket.falk@brocku.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16429430

Citation

Falk, Bareket, et al. "Effect of Low Altitude at the Dead Sea On Exercise Capacity and Cardiopulmonary Response to Exercise in Cystic Fibrosis Patients With Moderate to Severe Lung Disease." Pediatric Pulmonology, vol. 41, no. 3, 2006, pp. 234-41.
Falk B, Nini A, Zigel L, et al. Effect of low altitude at the Dead Sea on exercise capacity and cardiopulmonary response to exercise in cystic fibrosis patients with moderate to severe lung disease. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2006;41(3):234-41.
Falk, B., Nini, A., Zigel, L., Yahav, Y., Aviram, M., Rivlin, J., Bentur, L., Avital, A., Dotan, R., & Blau, H. (2006). Effect of low altitude at the Dead Sea on exercise capacity and cardiopulmonary response to exercise in cystic fibrosis patients with moderate to severe lung disease. Pediatric Pulmonology, 41(3), 234-41.
Falk B, et al. Effect of Low Altitude at the Dead Sea On Exercise Capacity and Cardiopulmonary Response to Exercise in Cystic Fibrosis Patients With Moderate to Severe Lung Disease. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2006;41(3):234-41. PubMed PMID: 16429430.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of low altitude at the Dead Sea on exercise capacity and cardiopulmonary response to exercise in cystic fibrosis patients with moderate to severe lung disease. AU - Falk,Bareket, AU - Nini,Asaph, AU - Zigel,Levana, AU - Yahav,Yaacov, AU - Aviram,Micha, AU - Rivlin,Joseph, AU - Bentur,Lea, AU - Avital,Avraham, AU - Dotan,Raffy, AU - Blau,Hannah, PY - 2006/1/24/pubmed PY - 2006/7/28/medline PY - 2006/1/24/entrez SP - 234 EP - 41 JF - Pediatric pulmonology JO - Pediatr. Pulmonol. VL - 41 IS - 3 N2 - Oxygen supplementation may improve exercise tolerance and the physiological response to exercise in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Elevated barometric pressure at low altitude is a simple means of increasing the quantity of inspired oxygen. Our objectives were to examine the effect of natural oxygen enrichment (at the Dead Sea, 396 m below sea level) on exercise capacity, and the physiological responses to maximal and submaximal exercise in CF patients. Patients were tested twice: at sea level (barometric pressure, 754 +/- 6 mmHg, mean +/- SD), and at the Dead Sea (barometric pressure, 791 +/- 3 mmHg), in a randomized crossover design. We studied 14 CF patients (6 females, 8 males), aged 15-45 years, with moderate to severe lung disease (mean forced expired volume in 1 sec = 50.0 +/- 11.2% predicted). Tests at each site included resting spirometry, anthropometry, a graded submaximal exercise test, a maximal exercise test on a treadmill, and a 6-min walk test. Tests were performed in identical order at both sites. Tests at the Dead Sea were performed 72 hr after arrival. No differences between sites were observed in lung function at rest. Peak oxygen consumption was significantly improved at the Dead Sea compared with sea level (1.68 +/- 0.73 vs. 1.57 +/- 0.74 l/min, respectively, P = 0.05), along with an improvement in the ventilatory equivalent for oxygen (41.2 +/- 6.3 vs. 46.1 +/- 7.1, respectively, P < 0.05). During submaximal exercise, blood oxygen saturation improved at the Dead Sea compared with sea level at all exercise intensities (P < 0.05). In conclusion, these results suggest that even a brief stay at the Dead Sea area may have physiological benefits for CF patients with moderate to severe lung disease. SN - 8755-6863 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16429430/Effect_of_low_altitude_at_the_Dead_Sea_on_exercise_capacity_and_cardiopulmonary_response_to_exercise_in_cystic_fibrosis_patients_with_moderate_to_severe_lung_disease_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ppul.20342 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -