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Hospital nurse administrators in Japan: a feminist dimensional analysis.
Int Nurs Rev. 2006 Mar; 53(1):59-65.IN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Nursing administration research is scarce in Japan during a time when health care is rapidly reforming and baccalaureate and graduate nursing programmes are rapidly developing. Additionally, nursing administration content relies heavily on Western and non-nursing theories, some of which have been criticized for male bias.

PURPOSE

The purpose of this article is to present key findings from a qualitative study that explored the perspectives or viewpoints of 16 Japanese senior female nurse administrators in hospitals in order to learn what was happening in their working situations and how they were managing.

DESIGN AND METHODS

This feminist study used dimensional analysis strategies for data collection and analysis. Semi-structured, tape-recorded interviews were conducted by both researchers in Japanese, transcribed into Japanese, and translated into English.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

The resulting explanatory matrix portrayed a story of 16 nurse administrators, most of whom were able successfully to enact a management role in a context of role ambiguity that was congruent with their relational values and beliefs. Important conditions influencing value-based role enactment included organization mission and purpose, organization structure, nurse-doctor relationships, participant-supervisor relationships, and personal attributes. Many participants were able to overcome barriers in these categories using strategies of tempered radicalism and consequently made positive organizational changes.

CONCLUSIONS

Advanced formal education, better organizational support, and a raised consciousness among nurses that views nurses and midwives as equal partners with other professionals will enable Japanese nurse administrators to help advance patient-centred care and nursing development and empowerment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Aichi Medical University, College of Nursing, Nagakute-cho, Aichi-ken, Japan. cherylbrandi@hotmail.comNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16430762

Citation

Brandi, C L., and A Naito. "Hospital Nurse Administrators in Japan: a Feminist Dimensional Analysis." International Nursing Review, vol. 53, no. 1, 2006, pp. 59-65.
Brandi CL, Naito A. Hospital nurse administrators in Japan: a feminist dimensional analysis. Int Nurs Rev. 2006;53(1):59-65.
Brandi, C. L., & Naito, A. (2006). Hospital nurse administrators in Japan: a feminist dimensional analysis. International Nursing Review, 53(1), 59-65.
Brandi CL, Naito A. Hospital Nurse Administrators in Japan: a Feminist Dimensional Analysis. Int Nurs Rev. 2006;53(1):59-65. PubMed PMID: 16430762.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hospital nurse administrators in Japan: a feminist dimensional analysis. AU - Brandi,C L, AU - Naito,A, PY - 2006/1/25/pubmed PY - 2006/4/12/medline PY - 2006/1/25/entrez SP - 59 EP - 65 JF - International nursing review JO - Int Nurs Rev VL - 53 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Nursing administration research is scarce in Japan during a time when health care is rapidly reforming and baccalaureate and graduate nursing programmes are rapidly developing. Additionally, nursing administration content relies heavily on Western and non-nursing theories, some of which have been criticized for male bias. PURPOSE: The purpose of this article is to present key findings from a qualitative study that explored the perspectives or viewpoints of 16 Japanese senior female nurse administrators in hospitals in order to learn what was happening in their working situations and how they were managing. DESIGN AND METHODS: This feminist study used dimensional analysis strategies for data collection and analysis. Semi-structured, tape-recorded interviews were conducted by both researchers in Japanese, transcribed into Japanese, and translated into English. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The resulting explanatory matrix portrayed a story of 16 nurse administrators, most of whom were able successfully to enact a management role in a context of role ambiguity that was congruent with their relational values and beliefs. Important conditions influencing value-based role enactment included organization mission and purpose, organization structure, nurse-doctor relationships, participant-supervisor relationships, and personal attributes. Many participants were able to overcome barriers in these categories using strategies of tempered radicalism and consequently made positive organizational changes. CONCLUSIONS: Advanced formal education, better organizational support, and a raised consciousness among nurses that views nurses and midwives as equal partners with other professionals will enable Japanese nurse administrators to help advance patient-centred care and nursing development and empowerment. SN - 0020-8132 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16430762/Hospital_nurse_administrators_in_Japan:_a_feminist_dimensional_analysis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1466-7657.2006.00442.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -