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Collett's snake (Pseudechis colletti) envenoming in snake handlers.
QJM. 2006 Feb; 99(2):109-15.QJM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Collett's snake (Pseudechis colletti) is a member of the black snake genus and occurs in a warm temperate to sub-tropical region of central Queensland, Australia. There are no reports of bites occurring in the wild, and bites were previously thought to cause only minor effects. They are a popular snake among zoos and exotic snake keepers.

AIM

To investigate the clinical effects of severe envenoming by Collett's snake, and possible treatment options.

DESIGN

Case series.

METHODS

Clinical and laboratory features are described for six bites, all in snake handlers.

RESULTS

All six bites were from captive snakes, resulting in severe envenoming in four. Two patients were treated early with black snake antivenom, and only developed an anticoagulant coagulopathy and mild myolysis. Two developed anticoagulant coagulopathy and severe rhabdomyolysis associated with acute renal failure, requiring haemodialysis; both received antivenom >10 h after the bite, and initially received minimal fluid replacement. Other effects included thrombocytopenia, non-immune haemolytic anaemia and a marked leukocytosis.

DISCUSSION

Collett's snake envenoming is characterized by early generalized systemic effects (nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhoea and headache) and an anticoagulant coagulopathy, followed in some cases by rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure in untreated patients within 24 h. Early initiation of fluid therapy and treatment with black snake antivenom should be undertaken in all envenomed patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Toxicology, Newcastle Mater Hospital, Edith St, Waratah NSW 2298, Australia. gsbite@ferntree.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16434468

Citation

Isbister, G K., et al. "Collett's Snake (Pseudechis Colletti) Envenoming in Snake Handlers." QJM : Monthly Journal of the Association of Physicians, vol. 99, no. 2, 2006, pp. 109-15.
Isbister GK, Hooper MR, Dowsett R, et al. Collett's snake (Pseudechis colletti) envenoming in snake handlers. QJM. 2006;99(2):109-15.
Isbister, G. K., Hooper, M. R., Dowsett, R., Maw, G., Murray, L., & White, J. (2006). Collett's snake (Pseudechis colletti) envenoming in snake handlers. QJM : Monthly Journal of the Association of Physicians, 99(2), 109-15.
Isbister GK, et al. Collett's Snake (Pseudechis Colletti) Envenoming in Snake Handlers. QJM. 2006;99(2):109-15. PubMed PMID: 16434468.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Collett's snake (Pseudechis colletti) envenoming in snake handlers. AU - Isbister,G K, AU - Hooper,M R, AU - Dowsett,R, AU - Maw,G, AU - Murray,L, AU - White,J, Y1 - 2006/01/24/ PY - 2006/1/26/pubmed PY - 2006/7/21/medline PY - 2006/1/26/entrez SP - 109 EP - 15 JF - QJM : monthly journal of the Association of Physicians JO - QJM VL - 99 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Collett's snake (Pseudechis colletti) is a member of the black snake genus and occurs in a warm temperate to sub-tropical region of central Queensland, Australia. There are no reports of bites occurring in the wild, and bites were previously thought to cause only minor effects. They are a popular snake among zoos and exotic snake keepers. AIM: To investigate the clinical effects of severe envenoming by Collett's snake, and possible treatment options. DESIGN: Case series. METHODS: Clinical and laboratory features are described for six bites, all in snake handlers. RESULTS: All six bites were from captive snakes, resulting in severe envenoming in four. Two patients were treated early with black snake antivenom, and only developed an anticoagulant coagulopathy and mild myolysis. Two developed anticoagulant coagulopathy and severe rhabdomyolysis associated with acute renal failure, requiring haemodialysis; both received antivenom >10 h after the bite, and initially received minimal fluid replacement. Other effects included thrombocytopenia, non-immune haemolytic anaemia and a marked leukocytosis. DISCUSSION: Collett's snake envenoming is characterized by early generalized systemic effects (nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhoea and headache) and an anticoagulant coagulopathy, followed in some cases by rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure in untreated patients within 24 h. Early initiation of fluid therapy and treatment with black snake antivenom should be undertaken in all envenomed patients. SN - 1460-2725 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16434468/Collett's_snake__Pseudechis_colletti__envenoming_in_snake_handlers_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/qjmed/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/qjmed/hcl007 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -