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GABAergic signaling in young granule cells in the adult rat and mouse dentate gyrus.
Hippocampus 2006; 16(3):312-20H

Abstract

Throughout most of the developing brain, including the hippocampus, GABAergic synapses are the first to become functional. Several features of GABAergic signaling change across development, suggesting that this signaling in the immature brain may play important roles in the growth of young neurons and the establishment of networks. To determine whether GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R)-containing synapses in new neurons born in the adult dentate gyrus have similar immature features, we examined spontaneous and evoked GABA(A)R-mediated synaptic currents in young (POMC-EGFP or doublecortin-immunostained) granule cells in acute slice preparations from adult mice and rats. Spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) were observed in nearly all immature granule cells, but their frequency was considerably lower and their decay time constant was nearly two times longer than in neighboring mature (doublecortin-non-immunoreactive or EGFP-non-expressing) granule cells within the sub-granular zone. Evoked IPSCs (eIPSCs) in mature granule cells, but not immature granule cells, were sensitive to zolpidem, suggesting a maturational increase in GABA(A)R alpha1-subunit expression. Perforated-patch recording revealed that eIPSCs depolarized young neurons, but hyperpolarized mature neurons. The early establishment of synaptic GABAergic inputs slow IPSC decay time, and depolarizing action of eIPSCs are remarkably similar to features previously seen in neurons during development, suggesting that they are intrinsic features of immature neurons and not functions of the surrounding circuitry. These developmental features in adult-born granule cells could play a role in maturational processes such as developmental cell death. However, treatment of adult mice with GABA(A)R agonists and an inverse agonist did not significantly alter the number of 4- to 14-day-old BrdU-labeled cells.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Unit on Neuroplasticity, NIH, MSC 3718, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-3718, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16435314

Citation

Karten, Yashmin J G., et al. "GABAergic Signaling in Young Granule Cells in the Adult Rat and Mouse Dentate Gyrus." Hippocampus, vol. 16, no. 3, 2006, pp. 312-20.
Karten YJ, Jones MA, Jeurling SI, et al. GABAergic signaling in young granule cells in the adult rat and mouse dentate gyrus. Hippocampus. 2006;16(3):312-20.
Karten, Y. J., Jones, M. A., Jeurling, S. I., & Cameron, H. A. (2006). GABAergic signaling in young granule cells in the adult rat and mouse dentate gyrus. Hippocampus, 16(3), pp. 312-20.
Karten YJ, et al. GABAergic Signaling in Young Granule Cells in the Adult Rat and Mouse Dentate Gyrus. Hippocampus. 2006;16(3):312-20. PubMed PMID: 16435314.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - GABAergic signaling in young granule cells in the adult rat and mouse dentate gyrus. AU - Karten,Yashmin J G, AU - Jones,Meredith A, AU - Jeurling,Sara I, AU - Cameron,Heather A, PY - 2006/1/26/pubmed PY - 2006/5/5/medline PY - 2006/1/26/entrez SP - 312 EP - 20 JF - Hippocampus JO - Hippocampus VL - 16 IS - 3 N2 - Throughout most of the developing brain, including the hippocampus, GABAergic synapses are the first to become functional. Several features of GABAergic signaling change across development, suggesting that this signaling in the immature brain may play important roles in the growth of young neurons and the establishment of networks. To determine whether GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R)-containing synapses in new neurons born in the adult dentate gyrus have similar immature features, we examined spontaneous and evoked GABA(A)R-mediated synaptic currents in young (POMC-EGFP or doublecortin-immunostained) granule cells in acute slice preparations from adult mice and rats. Spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) were observed in nearly all immature granule cells, but their frequency was considerably lower and their decay time constant was nearly two times longer than in neighboring mature (doublecortin-non-immunoreactive or EGFP-non-expressing) granule cells within the sub-granular zone. Evoked IPSCs (eIPSCs) in mature granule cells, but not immature granule cells, were sensitive to zolpidem, suggesting a maturational increase in GABA(A)R alpha1-subunit expression. Perforated-patch recording revealed that eIPSCs depolarized young neurons, but hyperpolarized mature neurons. The early establishment of synaptic GABAergic inputs slow IPSC decay time, and depolarizing action of eIPSCs are remarkably similar to features previously seen in neurons during development, suggesting that they are intrinsic features of immature neurons and not functions of the surrounding circuitry. These developmental features in adult-born granule cells could play a role in maturational processes such as developmental cell death. However, treatment of adult mice with GABA(A)R agonists and an inverse agonist did not significantly alter the number of 4- to 14-day-old BrdU-labeled cells. SN - 1050-9631 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16435314/GABAergic_signaling_in_young_granule_cells_in_the_adult_rat_and_mouse_dentate_gyrus_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/hipo.20165 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -