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Perceptions of the prevalence of cigarette smoking by peers: a study of Taiwanese, Filipino, and Thai high school students.
Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health. 2005 Sep; 36(5):1346-52.SA

Abstract

Youth cigarette smoking is a major public health concern in Southeast Asia. A suspected determinant of youth smoking is perceived peer behavior. Previous research has suggested that the probability that a teenager will use substances increases when there is the perception that most peers engage in the substance use behavior. This study aimed to assess the perceptions of the prevalence of peer cigarette smoking in samples of high school students from three Southeast Asian countries and to examine the association of these perceptions to self-reported personal use of cigarettes. Perceptions of the prevalence of peer smoking were generally characterized by the perception that most students do not smoke. However, a significant percentage of students held the perception that most students were current smokers. Students who held this perception were at increased risk of being current smokers relative to those who believed most students were not current smokers. The results of this study imply that public health programs may benefit from health promotion interventions which focus on dispelling misconceptions that most youth smoke cigarettes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health Science, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84604, USA. randy_page@byu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16438169

Citation

Page, Randy M., et al. "Perceptions of the Prevalence of Cigarette Smoking By Peers: a Study of Taiwanese, Filipino, and Thai High School Students." The Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health, vol. 36, no. 5, 2005, pp. 1346-52.
Page RM, Zarco EP, Suwanteerangkul J, et al. Perceptions of the prevalence of cigarette smoking by peers: a study of Taiwanese, Filipino, and Thai high school students. Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health. 2005;36(5):1346-52.
Page, R. M., Zarco, E. P., Suwanteerangkul, J., Ching, M. L., Miao, N. F., & Taylor, J. (2005). Perceptions of the prevalence of cigarette smoking by peers: a study of Taiwanese, Filipino, and Thai high school students. The Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health, 36(5), 1346-52.
Page RM, et al. Perceptions of the Prevalence of Cigarette Smoking By Peers: a Study of Taiwanese, Filipino, and Thai High School Students. Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health. 2005;36(5):1346-52. PubMed PMID: 16438169.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Perceptions of the prevalence of cigarette smoking by peers: a study of Taiwanese, Filipino, and Thai high school students. AU - Page,Randy M, AU - Zarco,Emilia Patricia, AU - Suwanteerangkul,Jiraporn, AU - Ching,Mei-Lee, AU - Miao,Nae-Fang, AU - Taylor,Jerry, PY - 2006/1/28/pubmed PY - 2006/4/1/medline PY - 2006/1/28/entrez SP - 1346 EP - 52 JF - The Southeast Asian journal of tropical medicine and public health JO - Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health VL - 36 IS - 5 N2 - Youth cigarette smoking is a major public health concern in Southeast Asia. A suspected determinant of youth smoking is perceived peer behavior. Previous research has suggested that the probability that a teenager will use substances increases when there is the perception that most peers engage in the substance use behavior. This study aimed to assess the perceptions of the prevalence of peer cigarette smoking in samples of high school students from three Southeast Asian countries and to examine the association of these perceptions to self-reported personal use of cigarettes. Perceptions of the prevalence of peer smoking were generally characterized by the perception that most students do not smoke. However, a significant percentage of students held the perception that most students were current smokers. Students who held this perception were at increased risk of being current smokers relative to those who believed most students were not current smokers. The results of this study imply that public health programs may benefit from health promotion interventions which focus on dispelling misconceptions that most youth smoke cigarettes. SN - 0125-1562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16438169/Perceptions_of_the_prevalence_of_cigarette_smoking_by_peers:_a_study_of_Taiwanese_Filipino_and_Thai_high_school_students_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/smokingandyouth.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -