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Acrylamide in Japanese processed foods and factors affecting acrylamide level in potato chips and tea.
Adv Exp Med Biol. 2005; 561:405-13.AE

Abstract

Acrylamide concentrations in processed foods sold in Japanese markets were analyzed by LC-MS/MS and GC-MS methods. Most potato chips and whole potato-based fried snacks showed acrylamide concentration higher than 1000 microg/kg. The concentrations in non-whole potato based Japanese snacks, including rice crackers and candied sweet potatoes, were less tha. 350 microg/kg. Those in instant precooked noodles were less than 100 microg/kg with only one exception. The effect of storage condition of potato tubers on acrylamide concentration in potato chips after frying was also investigated. Sugar content in the tubers increased during cold storage, and the acrylamide concentration increased accordingly. The concentrations of asparagine and other amino acids, however, did not change during the cold storage. High correlations were observed between the acrylamide content in the chips and glucose and fructose contents in the tubers. This fact indicated that the limiting factor for acrylamide formation in potato chips is reducing sugar, not asparagine content in the tubers. Effects of roasting time and temperature on acrylamide concentration in roasted green tea are also described.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Food Research Institute, 2-1-12 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8642, Japan. mitsuru@nfri.affrc.go.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16438315

Citation

Yoshida, Mitsuru, et al. "Acrylamide in Japanese Processed Foods and Factors Affecting Acrylamide Level in Potato Chips and Tea." Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol. 561, 2005, pp. 405-13.
Yoshida M, Ono H, Chuda Y, et al. Acrylamide in Japanese processed foods and factors affecting acrylamide level in potato chips and tea. Adv Exp Med Biol. 2005;561:405-13.
Yoshida, M., Ono, H., Chuda, Y., Yada, H., Ohnishi-Kameyama, M., Kobayashi, H., Ohara-Takada, A., Matsuura-Endo, C., Mori, M., Hayashi, N., & Yamaguchi, Y. (2005). Acrylamide in Japanese processed foods and factors affecting acrylamide level in potato chips and tea. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, 561, 405-13.
Yoshida M, et al. Acrylamide in Japanese Processed Foods and Factors Affecting Acrylamide Level in Potato Chips and Tea. Adv Exp Med Biol. 2005;561:405-13. PubMed PMID: 16438315.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acrylamide in Japanese processed foods and factors affecting acrylamide level in potato chips and tea. AU - Yoshida,Mitsuru, AU - Ono,Hiroshi, AU - Chuda,Yoshihiro, AU - Yada,Hiroshi, AU - Ohnishi-Kameyama,Mayumi, AU - Kobayashi,Hidetaka, AU - Ohara-Takada,Akiko, AU - Matsuura-Endo,Chie, AU - Mori,Motoyuki, AU - Hayashi,Nobuyuki, AU - Yamaguchi,Yuichi, PY - 2006/1/28/pubmed PY - 2006/2/28/medline PY - 2006/1/28/entrez SP - 405 EP - 13 JF - Advances in experimental medicine and biology JO - Adv Exp Med Biol VL - 561 N2 - Acrylamide concentrations in processed foods sold in Japanese markets were analyzed by LC-MS/MS and GC-MS methods. Most potato chips and whole potato-based fried snacks showed acrylamide concentration higher than 1000 microg/kg. The concentrations in non-whole potato based Japanese snacks, including rice crackers and candied sweet potatoes, were less tha. 350 microg/kg. Those in instant precooked noodles were less than 100 microg/kg with only one exception. The effect of storage condition of potato tubers on acrylamide concentration in potato chips after frying was also investigated. Sugar content in the tubers increased during cold storage, and the acrylamide concentration increased accordingly. The concentrations of asparagine and other amino acids, however, did not change during the cold storage. High correlations were observed between the acrylamide content in the chips and glucose and fructose contents in the tubers. This fact indicated that the limiting factor for acrylamide formation in potato chips is reducing sugar, not asparagine content in the tubers. Effects of roasting time and temperature on acrylamide concentration in roasted green tea are also described. SN - 0065-2598 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16438315/Acrylamide_in_Japanese_processed_foods_and_factors_affecting_acrylamide_level_in_potato_chips_and_tea_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/0-387-24980-X_31 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -