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Municipal distribution of bladder cancer mortality in Spain: possible role of mining and industry.
BMC Public Health. 2006 Jan 27; 6:17.BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Spain shows the highest bladder cancer incidence rates in men among European countries. The most important risk factors are tobacco smoking and occupational exposure to a range of different chemical substances, such as aromatic amines.

METHODS

This paper describes the municipal distribution of bladder cancer mortality and attempts to "adjust" this spatial pattern for the prevalence of smokers, using the autoregressive spatial model proposed by Besag, York and Molliè, with relative risk of lung cancer mortality as a surrogate.

RESULTS

It has been possible to compile and ascertain the posterior distribution of relative risk for bladder cancer adjusted for lung cancer mortality, on the basis of a single Bayesian spatial model covering all of Spain's 8077 towns. Maps were plotted depicting smoothed relative risk (RR) estimates, and the distribution of the posterior probability of RR>1 by sex. Towns that registered the highest relative risks for both sexes were mostly located in the Provinces of Cadiz, Seville, Huelva, Barcelona and Almería. The highest-risk area in Barcelona Province corresponded to very specific municipal areas in the Bages district, e.g., Suría, Sallent, Balsareny, Manresa and Cardona.

CONCLUSION

Mining/industrial pollution and the risk entailed in certain occupational exposures could in part be dictating the pattern of municipal bladder cancer mortality in Spain. Population exposure to arsenic is a matter that calls for attention. It would be of great interest if the relationship between the chemical quality of drinking water and the frequency of bladder cancer could be studied.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Environmental and Cancer Epidemiology Unit, National Centre for Epidemiology, Carlos III Institute of Health, Madrid, Spain. glabente@isciii.esNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16438735

Citation

Lopez-Abente, Gonzalo, et al. "Municipal Distribution of Bladder Cancer Mortality in Spain: Possible Role of Mining and Industry." BMC Public Health, vol. 6, 2006, p. 17.
Lopez-Abente G, Aragones N, Ramis R, et al. Municipal distribution of bladder cancer mortality in Spain: possible role of mining and industry. BMC Public Health. 2006;6:17.
Lopez-Abente, G., Aragones, N., Ramis, R., Hernandez-Barrera, V., Perez-Gomez, B., Escolar-Pujolar, A., & Pollan, M. (2006). Municipal distribution of bladder cancer mortality in Spain: possible role of mining and industry. BMC Public Health, 6, 17.
Lopez-Abente G, et al. Municipal Distribution of Bladder Cancer Mortality in Spain: Possible Role of Mining and Industry. BMC Public Health. 2006 Jan 27;6:17. PubMed PMID: 16438735.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Municipal distribution of bladder cancer mortality in Spain: possible role of mining and industry. AU - Lopez-Abente,Gonzalo, AU - Aragones,Nuria, AU - Ramis,Rebeca, AU - Hernandez-Barrera,Valentin, AU - Perez-Gomez,Beatriz, AU - Escolar-Pujolar,Antonio, AU - Pollan,Marina, Y1 - 2006/01/27/ PY - 2005/08/22/received PY - 2006/01/27/accepted PY - 2006/1/28/pubmed PY - 2006/4/28/medline PY - 2006/1/28/entrez SP - 17 EP - 17 JF - BMC public health JO - BMC Public Health VL - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Spain shows the highest bladder cancer incidence rates in men among European countries. The most important risk factors are tobacco smoking and occupational exposure to a range of different chemical substances, such as aromatic amines. METHODS: This paper describes the municipal distribution of bladder cancer mortality and attempts to "adjust" this spatial pattern for the prevalence of smokers, using the autoregressive spatial model proposed by Besag, York and Molliè, with relative risk of lung cancer mortality as a surrogate. RESULTS: It has been possible to compile and ascertain the posterior distribution of relative risk for bladder cancer adjusted for lung cancer mortality, on the basis of a single Bayesian spatial model covering all of Spain's 8077 towns. Maps were plotted depicting smoothed relative risk (RR) estimates, and the distribution of the posterior probability of RR>1 by sex. Towns that registered the highest relative risks for both sexes were mostly located in the Provinces of Cadiz, Seville, Huelva, Barcelona and Almería. The highest-risk area in Barcelona Province corresponded to very specific municipal areas in the Bages district, e.g., Suría, Sallent, Balsareny, Manresa and Cardona. CONCLUSION: Mining/industrial pollution and the risk entailed in certain occupational exposures could in part be dictating the pattern of municipal bladder cancer mortality in Spain. Population exposure to arsenic is a matter that calls for attention. It would be of great interest if the relationship between the chemical quality of drinking water and the frequency of bladder cancer could be studied. SN - 1471-2458 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16438735/Municipal_distribution_of_bladder_cancer_mortality_in_Spain:_possible_role_of_mining_and_industry_ L2 - https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2458-6-17 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -