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GB virus C and HIV-1 RNA load in single virus and co-infected West African individuals.
AIDS. 2006 Feb 14; 20(3):379-86.AIDS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Investigations on the impact of GB virus C (GBV-C) co-infection on HIV disease progression relied essentially on clinical follow-up but not on virologic parameters.

OBJECTIVES

To detect and quantify GBV-C RNA in West African populations co-infected or not with HIV-1 and to correlate the RNA load of HIV-1 and GBV-C in co-replicating patients with different clinical conditions.

METHODS

Three Ghanaian populations (blood donors, pregnant women and HIV-infected patients) were subdivided into six groups according to HIV-1 and clinical status and GBV-C and HIV-1 RNA load was tested by quantitative real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. In one population with HIV-1 disease, CD4+ cell count was also measured.

RESULTS

Prevalence of GBV-C markers in HIV-1-infected groups and HIV-1 non-infected pregnant women were significantly higher than in healthy blood donors. Similar levels and distribution of GBV-C RNA load were found in each population irrespective of HIV-1 status except for a lower GBV-C RNA load in AIDS patients. There was a significant shift of HIV-1 load towards lower value when GBV-C RNA was present and a trend towards an inverse correlation between HIV-1 and GBV-C RNA load. A positive correlation between CD4+ cell count and GBV-C RNA load in symptomatic HIV-1-infected patients was observed.

CONCLUSIONS

The moderate impact of GBV-C on HIV-1 viremia is unlikely to entirely account for a favourable clinical outcome of replicating co-infections.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Blood Service, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16439871

Citation

Li, Chengyao, et al. "GB Virus C and HIV-1 RNA Load in Single Virus and Co-infected West African Individuals." AIDS (London, England), vol. 20, no. 3, 2006, pp. 379-86.
Li C, Collini P, Danso K, et al. GB virus C and HIV-1 RNA load in single virus and co-infected West African individuals. AIDS. 2006;20(3):379-86.
Li, C., Collini, P., Danso, K., Owusu-Ofori, S., Dompreh, A., Candotti, D., Opare-Sem, O., & Allain, J. P. (2006). GB virus C and HIV-1 RNA load in single virus and co-infected West African individuals. AIDS (London, England), 20(3), 379-86.
Li C, et al. GB Virus C and HIV-1 RNA Load in Single Virus and Co-infected West African Individuals. AIDS. 2006 Feb 14;20(3):379-86. PubMed PMID: 16439871.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - GB virus C and HIV-1 RNA load in single virus and co-infected West African individuals. AU - Li,Chengyao, AU - Collini,Paul, AU - Danso,Kwabena, AU - Owusu-Ofori,Shirley, AU - Dompreh,Albert, AU - Candotti,Daniel, AU - Opare-Sem,Ohene, AU - Allain,Jean-Pierre, PY - 2006/1/28/pubmed PY - 2006/10/21/medline PY - 2006/1/28/entrez SP - 379 EP - 86 JF - AIDS (London, England) JO - AIDS VL - 20 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Investigations on the impact of GB virus C (GBV-C) co-infection on HIV disease progression relied essentially on clinical follow-up but not on virologic parameters. OBJECTIVES: To detect and quantify GBV-C RNA in West African populations co-infected or not with HIV-1 and to correlate the RNA load of HIV-1 and GBV-C in co-replicating patients with different clinical conditions. METHODS: Three Ghanaian populations (blood donors, pregnant women and HIV-infected patients) were subdivided into six groups according to HIV-1 and clinical status and GBV-C and HIV-1 RNA load was tested by quantitative real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. In one population with HIV-1 disease, CD4+ cell count was also measured. RESULTS: Prevalence of GBV-C markers in HIV-1-infected groups and HIV-1 non-infected pregnant women were significantly higher than in healthy blood donors. Similar levels and distribution of GBV-C RNA load were found in each population irrespective of HIV-1 status except for a lower GBV-C RNA load in AIDS patients. There was a significant shift of HIV-1 load towards lower value when GBV-C RNA was present and a trend towards an inverse correlation between HIV-1 and GBV-C RNA load. A positive correlation between CD4+ cell count and GBV-C RNA load in symptomatic HIV-1-infected patients was observed. CONCLUSIONS: The moderate impact of GBV-C on HIV-1 viremia is unlikely to entirely account for a favourable clinical outcome of replicating co-infections. SN - 0269-9370 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16439871/GB_virus_C_and_HIV_1_RNA_load_in_single_virus_and_co_infected_West_African_individuals_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/01.aids.0000200536.79360.03 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -