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Double aneuploidy in three Egyptian patients: Down-Turner and Down-Klinefelter syndromes.
Genet Couns. 2005; 16(4):393-402.GC

Abstract

The co-occurrence of two numerical chromosomal abnormalities in same individual (double aneuploidy) is relatively rare and its clinical presentations are variable depending on the predominating aneuploidy or a combination effect of both. Furthermore, double aneuploidy involving both autosomal and sex chromosomes is seldom described. In this study, we present three patients with double aneuploidy involving chromosome 21 and sex chromosomes. They all had the classical non disjunction trisomy 21; that was associated with monosomy X in two of them and double X in the other. Clinically, they had most of the phenotypic features of Down syndrome as well as variable features characteristic of Turner or Klinefelter syndrome. Cytogenetic studies and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis were carried out for all patients and their parents. The first patient was a male, mosaic with 2 cell lines (45,X/47,XY,+21) by regular banding techniques and had an affected sib with Down syndrome (47,XY,+21). The second was a female, mosaic (46,X,+21/47,XX,+21) where monosomy X was detected only by FISH in 15 percentages of cells, nevertheless, stigmata of Turner syndrome was more obvious in this patient. The third patient had non mosaic double trisomy; Down-Klinefelter (48,XXY,+21) presented with Down syndrome phenotype. Parental karyotypes and FISH studies for these patients were normal with no evidence of mosaicism. In this report, we review the variable clinical presentations among the few reported cases with the same aneuploidy in relation to ours. Also, the proposed mechanisms of double aneuploidy and the occurrence of non-disjunction in more than one family member are discussed. This study emphasizes the importance of molecular cytogenetics studies for more than one tissue in cases with atypical features of characteristic chromosomal aberration syndromes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of double aneuploidy, Down-Turner and Down-Klinefelter syndromes in Egyptian patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Clinical Genetics Department, National Research Centre, Cairo, Egypt. mszaki60@internetegypt.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16440882

Citation

Zaki, M S., et al. "Double Aneuploidy in Three Egyptian Patients: Down-Turner and Down-Klinefelter Syndromes." Genetic Counseling (Geneva, Switzerland), vol. 16, no. 4, 2005, pp. 393-402.
Zaki MS, Kamel AA, El-Ruby M. Double aneuploidy in three Egyptian patients: Down-Turner and Down-Klinefelter syndromes. Genet Couns. 2005;16(4):393-402.
Zaki, M. S., Kamel, A. A., & El-Ruby, M. (2005). Double aneuploidy in three Egyptian patients: Down-Turner and Down-Klinefelter syndromes. Genetic Counseling (Geneva, Switzerland), 16(4), 393-402.
Zaki MS, Kamel AA, El-Ruby M. Double Aneuploidy in Three Egyptian Patients: Down-Turner and Down-Klinefelter Syndromes. Genet Couns. 2005;16(4):393-402. PubMed PMID: 16440882.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Double aneuploidy in three Egyptian patients: Down-Turner and Down-Klinefelter syndromes. AU - Zaki,M S, AU - Kamel,A A, AU - El-Ruby,M, PY - 2006/1/31/pubmed PY - 2006/4/6/medline PY - 2006/1/31/entrez SP - 393 EP - 402 JF - Genetic counseling (Geneva, Switzerland) JO - Genet. Couns. VL - 16 IS - 4 N2 - The co-occurrence of two numerical chromosomal abnormalities in same individual (double aneuploidy) is relatively rare and its clinical presentations are variable depending on the predominating aneuploidy or a combination effect of both. Furthermore, double aneuploidy involving both autosomal and sex chromosomes is seldom described. In this study, we present three patients with double aneuploidy involving chromosome 21 and sex chromosomes. They all had the classical non disjunction trisomy 21; that was associated with monosomy X in two of them and double X in the other. Clinically, they had most of the phenotypic features of Down syndrome as well as variable features characteristic of Turner or Klinefelter syndrome. Cytogenetic studies and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis were carried out for all patients and their parents. The first patient was a male, mosaic with 2 cell lines (45,X/47,XY,+21) by regular banding techniques and had an affected sib with Down syndrome (47,XY,+21). The second was a female, mosaic (46,X,+21/47,XX,+21) where monosomy X was detected only by FISH in 15 percentages of cells, nevertheless, stigmata of Turner syndrome was more obvious in this patient. The third patient had non mosaic double trisomy; Down-Klinefelter (48,XXY,+21) presented with Down syndrome phenotype. Parental karyotypes and FISH studies for these patients were normal with no evidence of mosaicism. In this report, we review the variable clinical presentations among the few reported cases with the same aneuploidy in relation to ours. Also, the proposed mechanisms of double aneuploidy and the occurrence of non-disjunction in more than one family member are discussed. This study emphasizes the importance of molecular cytogenetics studies for more than one tissue in cases with atypical features of characteristic chromosomal aberration syndromes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of double aneuploidy, Down-Turner and Down-Klinefelter syndromes in Egyptian patients. SN - 1015-8146 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16440882/Double_aneuploidy_in_three_Egyptian_patients:_Down_Turner_and_Down_Klinefelter_syndromes_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/downsyndrome.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -