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Rural residence and Hispanic ethnicity: doubly disadvantaged for diabetes?
J Rural Health. 2006 Winter; 22(1):63-8.JR

Abstract

CONTEXT

Hispanics are at increased risk for diabetes, while rural residents have historically had decreased access to care.

PURPOSE

To determine whether living in a rural area and being Hispanic confers special risks for diagnosis and control of diabetes.

METHODS

We analyzed the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994). Hispanics and non-Hispanic white adults were classified according to rural/urban residence to create 4 ethnicity-residence groups. Investigated outcomes were previously diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes. Among those with diagnosed diabetes, we investigated control of glucose, hypertension, and lipids.

FINDINGS

The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes was greatest for rural residents, especially for rural Hispanics (8.2%) versus that for urban whites (4.6%), rural whites (6.5%), or urban Hispanics (4.5%), (P < .01). However, urban Hispanics were most likely to have undiagnosed diabetes at 3.7%, versus 2.3% of rural whites, 2.8% of urban whites, and 2.7% of rural Hispanics (P = .04). Among people with diagnosed diabetes, there was no difference in glycemic control between the 4 groups. Rural Hispanics with diagnosed diabetes had the greatest prevalence of elevated systolic blood pressure at 45%, compared to 37% of urban whites, 29% of rural whites, 28% of urban Hispanics (P = .01). In regression models controlling for potential confounders, there were no differences among urban and rural whites and Hispanics in the likelihood of undiagnosed diabetes or in glycemic control for those with diagnosed diabetes.

CONCLUSIONS

Initiatives that target Hispanic health, and especially diabetes, should acknowledge rural/urban Hispanic health differences.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA. koopmanr@musc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16441338

Citation

Koopman, Richelle J., et al. "Rural Residence and Hispanic Ethnicity: Doubly Disadvantaged for Diabetes?" The Journal of Rural Health : Official Journal of the American Rural Health Association and the National Rural Health Care Association, vol. 22, no. 1, 2006, pp. 63-8.
Koopman RJ, Mainous AG, Geesey ME. Rural residence and Hispanic ethnicity: doubly disadvantaged for diabetes? J Rural Health. 2006;22(1):63-8.
Koopman, R. J., Mainous, A. G., & Geesey, M. E. (2006). Rural residence and Hispanic ethnicity: doubly disadvantaged for diabetes? The Journal of Rural Health : Official Journal of the American Rural Health Association and the National Rural Health Care Association, 22(1), 63-8.
Koopman RJ, Mainous AG, Geesey ME. Rural Residence and Hispanic Ethnicity: Doubly Disadvantaged for Diabetes. J Rural Health. 2006;22(1):63-8. PubMed PMID: 16441338.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Rural residence and Hispanic ethnicity: doubly disadvantaged for diabetes? AU - Koopman,Richelle J, AU - Mainous,Arch G,3rd AU - Geesey,Mark E, PY - 2006/1/31/pubmed PY - 2006/3/24/medline PY - 2006/1/31/entrez SP - 63 EP - 8 JF - The Journal of rural health : official journal of the American Rural Health Association and the National Rural Health Care Association JO - J Rural Health VL - 22 IS - 1 N2 - CONTEXT: Hispanics are at increased risk for diabetes, while rural residents have historically had decreased access to care. PURPOSE: To determine whether living in a rural area and being Hispanic confers special risks for diagnosis and control of diabetes. METHODS: We analyzed the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994). Hispanics and non-Hispanic white adults were classified according to rural/urban residence to create 4 ethnicity-residence groups. Investigated outcomes were previously diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes. Among those with diagnosed diabetes, we investigated control of glucose, hypertension, and lipids. FINDINGS: The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes was greatest for rural residents, especially for rural Hispanics (8.2%) versus that for urban whites (4.6%), rural whites (6.5%), or urban Hispanics (4.5%), (P < .01). However, urban Hispanics were most likely to have undiagnosed diabetes at 3.7%, versus 2.3% of rural whites, 2.8% of urban whites, and 2.7% of rural Hispanics (P = .04). Among people with diagnosed diabetes, there was no difference in glycemic control between the 4 groups. Rural Hispanics with diagnosed diabetes had the greatest prevalence of elevated systolic blood pressure at 45%, compared to 37% of urban whites, 29% of rural whites, 28% of urban Hispanics (P = .01). In regression models controlling for potential confounders, there were no differences among urban and rural whites and Hispanics in the likelihood of undiagnosed diabetes or in glycemic control for those with diagnosed diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: Initiatives that target Hispanic health, and especially diabetes, should acknowledge rural/urban Hispanic health differences. SN - 0890-765X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16441338/Rural_residence_and_Hispanic_ethnicity:_doubly_disadvantaged_for_diabetes L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1748-0361.2006.00009.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -