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Upper gastrointestinal mucosal abnormalities and blood loss complicating low-dose aspirin and antithrombotic therapy.
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2006 Feb 15; 23(4):489-95.AP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Little is known about the site and nature of bleeding lesions related to low-dose aspirin and other antithrombotic agents.

AIM

To describe the mucosal abnormalities in patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding while being treated with these drugs.

METHODS

The endoscopic findings and clinical details were analysed in all patients presenting with haematemesis and/or melaena at a single centre during three calendar years. Associations between endoscopic findings and risk factors, including the intake of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, low-dose aspirin (75 mg daily) and other antithrombotic drugs including warfarin, clopidogrel, and dipyridamole, were assessed by logistic regression analysis.

RESULTS

In 674 upper gastrointestinal bleeders, we found that the odds ratio for the presence of erosive oesophagitis in aspirin users was 2 (95% CI, 1-3; P = 0.03) and 3 (2-5; P = 0.0003) in patients taking other antithrombotic agents. In 41 patients with oesophagitis and taking these drugs, 36 (88%) had cardiovascular disease and only 4 (10%) had peptic symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS

Erosive oesophagitis is common in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding taking low-dose aspirin or antithrombotic agents, and could potentially be confused with the coexisting heart disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gastroenterology, Crosshouse Hospital, Kilmarnock, Scotland, UK. ali.taha1@btinternet.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16441469

Citation

Taha, A S., et al. "Upper Gastrointestinal Mucosal Abnormalities and Blood Loss Complicating Low-dose Aspirin and Antithrombotic Therapy." Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, vol. 23, no. 4, 2006, pp. 489-95.
Taha AS, Angerson WJ, Knill-Jones RP, et al. Upper gastrointestinal mucosal abnormalities and blood loss complicating low-dose aspirin and antithrombotic therapy. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2006;23(4):489-95.
Taha, A. S., Angerson, W. J., Knill-Jones, R. P., & Blatchford, O. (2006). Upper gastrointestinal mucosal abnormalities and blood loss complicating low-dose aspirin and antithrombotic therapy. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 23(4), 489-95.
Taha AS, et al. Upper Gastrointestinal Mucosal Abnormalities and Blood Loss Complicating Low-dose Aspirin and Antithrombotic Therapy. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2006 Feb 15;23(4):489-95. PubMed PMID: 16441469.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Upper gastrointestinal mucosal abnormalities and blood loss complicating low-dose aspirin and antithrombotic therapy. AU - Taha,A S, AU - Angerson,W J, AU - Knill-Jones,R P, AU - Blatchford,O, PY - 2006/1/31/pubmed PY - 2006/6/30/medline PY - 2006/1/31/entrez SP - 489 EP - 95 JF - Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics JO - Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther. VL - 23 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Little is known about the site and nature of bleeding lesions related to low-dose aspirin and other antithrombotic agents. AIM: To describe the mucosal abnormalities in patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding while being treated with these drugs. METHODS: The endoscopic findings and clinical details were analysed in all patients presenting with haematemesis and/or melaena at a single centre during three calendar years. Associations between endoscopic findings and risk factors, including the intake of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, low-dose aspirin (75 mg daily) and other antithrombotic drugs including warfarin, clopidogrel, and dipyridamole, were assessed by logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: In 674 upper gastrointestinal bleeders, we found that the odds ratio for the presence of erosive oesophagitis in aspirin users was 2 (95% CI, 1-3; P = 0.03) and 3 (2-5; P = 0.0003) in patients taking other antithrombotic agents. In 41 patients with oesophagitis and taking these drugs, 36 (88%) had cardiovascular disease and only 4 (10%) had peptic symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Erosive oesophagitis is common in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding taking low-dose aspirin or antithrombotic agents, and could potentially be confused with the coexisting heart disease. SN - 0269-2813 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16441469/Upper_gastrointestinal_mucosal_abnormalities_and_blood_loss_complicating_low_dose_aspirin_and_antithrombotic_therapy_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2036.2006.02784.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -