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Coffee, caffeine, and risk of type 2 diabetes: a prospective cohort study in younger and middle-aged U.S. women.
Diabetes Care 2006; 29(2):398-403DC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

High habitual coffee consumption has been associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, but data on lower levels of consumption and on different types of coffee are sparse.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS

This is a prospective cohort study including 88,259 U.S. women of the Nurses' Health Study II aged 26-46 years without history of diabetes at baseline. Consumption of coffee and other caffeine-containing foods and drinks was assessed in 1991, 1995, and 1999. We documented 1,263 incident cases of confirmed type 2 diabetes between 1991 and 2001.

RESULTS

After adjustment for potential confounders, the relative risk of type 2 diabetes was 0.87 (95% CI 0.73-1.03) for one cup per day, 0.58 (0.49-0.68) for two to three cups per day, and 0.53 (0.41-0.68) for four or more cups per day compared with nondrinkers (P for trend <0.0001). Associations were similar for caffeinated (0.87 [0.83-0.91] for a one-cup increment per day) and decaffeinated (0.81 [0.73-0.90]) coffee and for filtered (0.86 [0.82-0.90]) and instant (0.83 [0.74-0.93]) coffee. Tea consumption was not substantially associated with risk of type 2 diabetes (0.88 [0.64-1.23] for four or more versus no cups per day; P for trend = 0.81).

CONCLUSIONS

These results suggest that moderate consumption of both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee may lower risk of type 2 diabetes in younger and middle-aged women. Coffee constituents other than caffeine may affect the development of type 2 diabetes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Ave., Boston, MA 02115, USA. rvandam@hsph.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16443894

Citation

van Dam, Rob M., et al. "Coffee, Caffeine, and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: a Prospective Cohort Study in Younger and Middle-aged U.S. Women." Diabetes Care, vol. 29, no. 2, 2006, pp. 398-403.
van Dam RM, Willett WC, Manson JE, et al. Coffee, caffeine, and risk of type 2 diabetes: a prospective cohort study in younger and middle-aged U.S. women. Diabetes Care. 2006;29(2):398-403.
van Dam, R. M., Willett, W. C., Manson, J. E., & Hu, F. B. (2006). Coffee, caffeine, and risk of type 2 diabetes: a prospective cohort study in younger and middle-aged U.S. women. Diabetes Care, 29(2), pp. 398-403.
van Dam RM, et al. Coffee, Caffeine, and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: a Prospective Cohort Study in Younger and Middle-aged U.S. Women. Diabetes Care. 2006;29(2):398-403. PubMed PMID: 16443894.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coffee, caffeine, and risk of type 2 diabetes: a prospective cohort study in younger and middle-aged U.S. women. AU - van Dam,Rob M, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Manson,Joann E, AU - Hu,Frank B, PY - 2006/1/31/pubmed PY - 2006/5/10/medline PY - 2006/1/31/entrez SP - 398 EP - 403 JF - Diabetes care JO - Diabetes Care VL - 29 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: High habitual coffee consumption has been associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, but data on lower levels of consumption and on different types of coffee are sparse. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This is a prospective cohort study including 88,259 U.S. women of the Nurses' Health Study II aged 26-46 years without history of diabetes at baseline. Consumption of coffee and other caffeine-containing foods and drinks was assessed in 1991, 1995, and 1999. We documented 1,263 incident cases of confirmed type 2 diabetes between 1991 and 2001. RESULTS: After adjustment for potential confounders, the relative risk of type 2 diabetes was 0.87 (95% CI 0.73-1.03) for one cup per day, 0.58 (0.49-0.68) for two to three cups per day, and 0.53 (0.41-0.68) for four or more cups per day compared with nondrinkers (P for trend <0.0001). Associations were similar for caffeinated (0.87 [0.83-0.91] for a one-cup increment per day) and decaffeinated (0.81 [0.73-0.90]) coffee and for filtered (0.86 [0.82-0.90]) and instant (0.83 [0.74-0.93]) coffee. Tea consumption was not substantially associated with risk of type 2 diabetes (0.88 [0.64-1.23] for four or more versus no cups per day; P for trend = 0.81). CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that moderate consumption of both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee may lower risk of type 2 diabetes in younger and middle-aged women. Coffee constituents other than caffeine may affect the development of type 2 diabetes. SN - 0149-5992 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16443894/Coffee_caffeine_and_risk_of_type_2_diabetes:_a_prospective_cohort_study_in_younger_and_middle_aged_U_S__women_ L2 - http://care.diabetesjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=16443894 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -