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Role of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in exacerbations and progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
Curr Opin Pulm Med. 2006 Mar; 12(2):118-24.CO

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW

Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is the most common bacterial pathogen associated with airway infection in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, both in stable disease and during exacerbations. Past attempts to elucidate its role as a pathogen in this disease yielded confusing and contradictory results, leading to its designation as an 'innocent bystander' with little if any pathogenic role in exacerbations and stable disease. Application of modern understanding of bacterial pathogenesis and of innovative research methodologies, however, has considerably clarified its role.

RECENT FINDINGS

Acquisition of antigenically diverse strains of nontypeable H. influenzae which engender a neutrophilic inflammatory response and strain-specific immunity appears to be the mechanism underlying recurrent exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In the stable phase of the disease, this pathogen appears to be an inflammatory stimulus in the lower airways with the potential to contribute to progressive airway obstruction that is characteristic of the condition. Several mechanisms may allow the infection to persist in the lower airways of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, including tissue invasion, antigenic alteration and biofilm formation.

SUMMARY

Though much has been learnt about nontypeable H. influenzae in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, new therapeutic and preventive approaches require an even greater understanding of this host-pathogen interaction.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University at Buffalo SUNY, New York, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16456381

Citation

Eldika, Nader, and Sanjay Sethi. "Role of Nontypeable Haemophilus Influenzae in Exacerbations and Progression of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease." Current Opinion in Pulmonary Medicine, vol. 12, no. 2, 2006, pp. 118-24.
Eldika N, Sethi S. Role of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in exacerbations and progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Curr Opin Pulm Med. 2006;12(2):118-24.
Eldika, N., & Sethi, S. (2006). Role of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in exacerbations and progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Current Opinion in Pulmonary Medicine, 12(2), 118-24.
Eldika N, Sethi S. Role of Nontypeable Haemophilus Influenzae in Exacerbations and Progression of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. Curr Opin Pulm Med. 2006;12(2):118-24. PubMed PMID: 16456381.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Role of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in exacerbations and progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. AU - Eldika,Nader, AU - Sethi,Sanjay, PY - 2006/2/4/pubmed PY - 2006/9/29/medline PY - 2006/2/4/entrez SP - 118 EP - 24 JF - Current opinion in pulmonary medicine JO - Curr Opin Pulm Med VL - 12 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is the most common bacterial pathogen associated with airway infection in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, both in stable disease and during exacerbations. Past attempts to elucidate its role as a pathogen in this disease yielded confusing and contradictory results, leading to its designation as an 'innocent bystander' with little if any pathogenic role in exacerbations and stable disease. Application of modern understanding of bacterial pathogenesis and of innovative research methodologies, however, has considerably clarified its role. RECENT FINDINGS: Acquisition of antigenically diverse strains of nontypeable H. influenzae which engender a neutrophilic inflammatory response and strain-specific immunity appears to be the mechanism underlying recurrent exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In the stable phase of the disease, this pathogen appears to be an inflammatory stimulus in the lower airways with the potential to contribute to progressive airway obstruction that is characteristic of the condition. Several mechanisms may allow the infection to persist in the lower airways of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, including tissue invasion, antigenic alteration and biofilm formation. SUMMARY: Though much has been learnt about nontypeable H. influenzae in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, new therapeutic and preventive approaches require an even greater understanding of this host-pathogen interaction. SN - 1070-5287 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16456381/Role_of_nontypeable_Haemophilus_influenzae_in_exacerbations_and_progression_of_chronic_obstructive_pulmonary_disease_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.mcp.0000208451.50231.8f DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -