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Association between the prevalence of obesity and adherence to the Mediterranean diet: the ATTICA study.
Nutrition. 2006 May; 22(5):449-56.N

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We evaluated the prevalence of obesity in relation to adherence to a Mediterranean diet.

METHODS

We conducted a cross-sectional survey that randomly enrolled 1514 men (18 to 87 y old) and 1528 women (18 to 89 y old) with no history of cardiovascular disease. Anthropometric indices were measured and frequency of various foods consumed during a usual week was recorded. Adherence to a Mediterranean diet was assessed by a diet score that incorporated the inherent characteristics of this diet.

RESULTS

Prevalences of overweight and obesity were 53% and 20% in men and 31% and 15% in women. An inverse relation was observed between diet score, waist-to-hip ratio (r = -0.31, P < 0.001), and body mass index (r = -0.4, P < 0.001) after adjusting for sex and age. Greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet (i.e., highest tertile) was associated with a 51% lower odds of being obese (odds ratio 0.49, 95% confidence interval 0.42 to 0.56) and a 59% lower odds of having central obesity (odds ratio 0.41, 95% confidence 0.35 to 0.47) compared with a non-Mediterranean diet (i.e., lowest tertile) after controlling for age, sex, physical activity status, metabolism, and other variables.

CONCLUSION

We observed an inverse relation between adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern and prevalence of obesity in a free-eating, population-based sample of men and women, irrespective of various potential confounders.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece. d.b.panagiotakos@usa.netNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16457990

Citation

Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B., et al. "Association Between the Prevalence of Obesity and Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet: the ATTICA Study." Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), vol. 22, no. 5, 2006, pp. 449-56.
Panagiotakos DB, Chrysohoou C, Pitsavos C, et al. Association between the prevalence of obesity and adherence to the Mediterranean diet: the ATTICA study. Nutrition. 2006;22(5):449-56.
Panagiotakos, D. B., Chrysohoou, C., Pitsavos, C., & Stefanadis, C. (2006). Association between the prevalence of obesity and adherence to the Mediterranean diet: the ATTICA study. Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), 22(5), 449-56.
Panagiotakos DB, et al. Association Between the Prevalence of Obesity and Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet: the ATTICA Study. Nutrition. 2006;22(5):449-56. PubMed PMID: 16457990.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between the prevalence of obesity and adherence to the Mediterranean diet: the ATTICA study. AU - Panagiotakos,Demosthenes B, AU - Chrysohoou,Christina, AU - Pitsavos,Christos, AU - Stefanadis,Christodoulos, Y1 - 2006/02/02/ PY - 2005/04/17/received PY - 2005/10/28/revised PY - 2005/11/07/accepted PY - 2006/2/7/pubmed PY - 2006/9/6/medline PY - 2006/2/7/entrez SP - 449 EP - 56 JF - Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.) JO - Nutrition VL - 22 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the prevalence of obesity in relation to adherence to a Mediterranean diet. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey that randomly enrolled 1514 men (18 to 87 y old) and 1528 women (18 to 89 y old) with no history of cardiovascular disease. Anthropometric indices were measured and frequency of various foods consumed during a usual week was recorded. Adherence to a Mediterranean diet was assessed by a diet score that incorporated the inherent characteristics of this diet. RESULTS: Prevalences of overweight and obesity were 53% and 20% in men and 31% and 15% in women. An inverse relation was observed between diet score, waist-to-hip ratio (r = -0.31, P < 0.001), and body mass index (r = -0.4, P < 0.001) after adjusting for sex and age. Greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet (i.e., highest tertile) was associated with a 51% lower odds of being obese (odds ratio 0.49, 95% confidence interval 0.42 to 0.56) and a 59% lower odds of having central obesity (odds ratio 0.41, 95% confidence 0.35 to 0.47) compared with a non-Mediterranean diet (i.e., lowest tertile) after controlling for age, sex, physical activity status, metabolism, and other variables. CONCLUSION: We observed an inverse relation between adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern and prevalence of obesity in a free-eating, population-based sample of men and women, irrespective of various potential confounders. SN - 0899-9007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16457990/Association_between_the_prevalence_of_obesity_and_adherence_to_the_Mediterranean_diet:_the_ATTICA_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0899-9007(05)00350-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -