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Faster plasma vitamin E disappearance in smokers is normalized by vitamin C supplementation.
Free Radic Biol Med 2006; 40(4):689-97FR

Abstract

Vitamin E disappearance is accelerated in cigarette smokers due to their increased oxidative stress and is inversely correlated with plasma vitamin C concentrations. Therefore, we hypothesized that ascorbic acid supplementation (500 mg, twice daily; 2 weeks) would normalize smokers' plasma alpha- and gamma-tocopherol disappearance rates and conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized crossover investigation in smokers (n=11) and nonsmokers (n=13) given a single dose of deuterium-labeled alpha- and gamma-tocopherols (50 mg each d6-RRR-alpha and d2-RRR-gamma-tocopheryl acetate). During the placebo trial, smokers, compared with nonsmokers, had significantly (P<0.05) greater alpha- and gamma-tocopherol fractional disappearance rates and shorter half-lives. Ascorbic acid supplementation doubled (P<0.0001) plasma ascorbic acid concentrations in both groups and attenuated smokers', but not nonsmokers', plasma alpha- and gamma-tocopherol (P<0.05) fractional disappearance rates by 25% and 45%, respectively. Likewise, smokers' plasma deuterium-labeled alpha- and gamma-tocopherol concentrations were significantly higher (P<0.05) at 72 h during ascorbic acid supplementation compared with placebo. Ascorbic acid supplementation did not significantly change (P>0.05) time of maximal or maximal-labeled alpha- and gamma-tocopherol concentrations. Smokers' plasma F2alpha-isoprostanes were approximately 26% higher than nonsmokers (P>0.05) and were not affected by ascorbic acid supplementation in either group (P>0.05). In summary, cigarette smoking increased plasma alpha- and gamma-tocopherol fractional disappearance rates, suggesting that the oxidative stress from smoking oxidizes tocopherols and that plasma ascorbic acid reduces alpha- and gamma-tocopheroxyl radicals to nonoxidized forms, thereby decreasing vitamin E disappearance in humans.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Linus Pauling Institute, 571 Weniger Hall, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16458200

Citation

Bruno, Richard S., et al. "Faster Plasma Vitamin E Disappearance in Smokers Is Normalized By Vitamin C Supplementation." Free Radical Biology & Medicine, vol. 40, no. 4, 2006, pp. 689-97.
Bruno RS, Leonard SW, Atkinson J, et al. Faster plasma vitamin E disappearance in smokers is normalized by vitamin C supplementation. Free Radic Biol Med. 2006;40(4):689-97.
Bruno, R. S., Leonard, S. W., Atkinson, J., Montine, T. J., Ramakrishnan, R., Bray, T. M., & Traber, M. G. (2006). Faster plasma vitamin E disappearance in smokers is normalized by vitamin C supplementation. Free Radical Biology & Medicine, 40(4), pp. 689-97.
Bruno RS, et al. Faster Plasma Vitamin E Disappearance in Smokers Is Normalized By Vitamin C Supplementation. Free Radic Biol Med. 2006 Feb 15;40(4):689-97. PubMed PMID: 16458200.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Faster plasma vitamin E disappearance in smokers is normalized by vitamin C supplementation. AU - Bruno,Richard S, AU - Leonard,Scott W, AU - Atkinson,Jeffery, AU - Montine,Thomas J, AU - Ramakrishnan,Rajasekhar, AU - Bray,Tammy M, AU - Traber,Maret G, Y1 - 2005/11/15/ PY - 2005/08/12/received PY - 2005/10/11/revised PY - 2005/10/18/accepted PY - 2006/2/7/pubmed PY - 2006/5/4/medline PY - 2006/2/7/entrez SP - 689 EP - 97 JF - Free radical biology & medicine JO - Free Radic. Biol. Med. VL - 40 IS - 4 N2 - Vitamin E disappearance is accelerated in cigarette smokers due to their increased oxidative stress and is inversely correlated with plasma vitamin C concentrations. Therefore, we hypothesized that ascorbic acid supplementation (500 mg, twice daily; 2 weeks) would normalize smokers' plasma alpha- and gamma-tocopherol disappearance rates and conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized crossover investigation in smokers (n=11) and nonsmokers (n=13) given a single dose of deuterium-labeled alpha- and gamma-tocopherols (50 mg each d6-RRR-alpha and d2-RRR-gamma-tocopheryl acetate). During the placebo trial, smokers, compared with nonsmokers, had significantly (P<0.05) greater alpha- and gamma-tocopherol fractional disappearance rates and shorter half-lives. Ascorbic acid supplementation doubled (P<0.0001) plasma ascorbic acid concentrations in both groups and attenuated smokers', but not nonsmokers', plasma alpha- and gamma-tocopherol (P<0.05) fractional disappearance rates by 25% and 45%, respectively. Likewise, smokers' plasma deuterium-labeled alpha- and gamma-tocopherol concentrations were significantly higher (P<0.05) at 72 h during ascorbic acid supplementation compared with placebo. Ascorbic acid supplementation did not significantly change (P>0.05) time of maximal or maximal-labeled alpha- and gamma-tocopherol concentrations. Smokers' plasma F2alpha-isoprostanes were approximately 26% higher than nonsmokers (P>0.05) and were not affected by ascorbic acid supplementation in either group (P>0.05). In summary, cigarette smoking increased plasma alpha- and gamma-tocopherol fractional disappearance rates, suggesting that the oxidative stress from smoking oxidizes tocopherols and that plasma ascorbic acid reduces alpha- and gamma-tocopheroxyl radicals to nonoxidized forms, thereby decreasing vitamin E disappearance in humans. SN - 0891-5849 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16458200/Faster_plasma_vitamin_E_disappearance_in_smokers_is_normalized_by_vitamin_C_supplementation_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0891-5849(05)00661-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -