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Breast milk fatty acids and allergic disease in preschool children: the Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy birth cohort study.
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2006 Feb; 117(2):440-7.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Better understanding of the association between early life lipid intakes and the development of allergic diseases is needed.

OBJECTIVE

We prospectively studied breast milk content of n-6, n-3, and trans fatty acids in relation to allergic symptoms at the ages of 1 and 4 years.

METHODS

Fatty acid content was determined in breast milk samples of 265 (158 allergic and 107 nonallergic) mothers of children participating in the Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy study. Outcome variables studied were parental reported eczema at age 1 year, eczema at age 4 years, asthma at age 4 years, and, in a subgroup of 133 children, sensitization at age 4 years.

RESULTS

In children of mothers with allergy, breast milk n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and the ratio between n-3 and n-6 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids were inversely associated with asthma and with persistent symptoms (eczema at age 1 year and eczema at age 4 years and/or asthma at age 4 years), but no associations between breast milk fatty acids and sensitization were observed. In children of mothers with allergy, also trans fatty acids tended to be inversely associated with allergic symptoms. In children of mothers without allergy, no associations between breast milk fatty acids and allergic symptoms were observed, but alpha-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) was positively associated with sensitization.

CONCLUSION

In susceptible infants, the risk to develop allergic symptoms, but not the risk of sensitization, was modified by intake of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids through breast milk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Prevention and Health Services Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. alet.wijga@rivm.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16461146

Citation

Wijga, Alet H., et al. "Breast Milk Fatty Acids and Allergic Disease in Preschool Children: the Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy Birth Cohort Study." The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 117, no. 2, 2006, pp. 440-7.
Wijga AH, van Houwelingen AC, Kerkhof M, et al. Breast milk fatty acids and allergic disease in preschool children: the Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy birth cohort study. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2006;117(2):440-7.
Wijga, A. H., van Houwelingen, A. C., Kerkhof, M., Tabak, C., de Jongste, J. C., Gerritsen, J., Boshuizen, H., Brunekreef, B., & Smit, H. A. (2006). Breast milk fatty acids and allergic disease in preschool children: the Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy birth cohort study. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 117(2), 440-7.
Wijga AH, et al. Breast Milk Fatty Acids and Allergic Disease in Preschool Children: the Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy Birth Cohort Study. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2006;117(2):440-7. PubMed PMID: 16461146.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Breast milk fatty acids and allergic disease in preschool children: the Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy birth cohort study. AU - Wijga,Alet H, AU - van Houwelingen,Adriana C, AU - Kerkhof,Marjan, AU - Tabak,Cora, AU - de Jongste,Johan C, AU - Gerritsen,Jorrit, AU - Boshuizen,Hendriek, AU - Brunekreef,Bert, AU - Smit,Henriette A, PY - 2005/08/15/received PY - 2005/10/06/revised PY - 2005/10/18/accepted PY - 2006/2/8/pubmed PY - 2006/3/24/medline PY - 2006/2/8/entrez SP - 440 EP - 7 JF - The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology JO - J Allergy Clin Immunol VL - 117 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Better understanding of the association between early life lipid intakes and the development of allergic diseases is needed. OBJECTIVE: We prospectively studied breast milk content of n-6, n-3, and trans fatty acids in relation to allergic symptoms at the ages of 1 and 4 years. METHODS: Fatty acid content was determined in breast milk samples of 265 (158 allergic and 107 nonallergic) mothers of children participating in the Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy study. Outcome variables studied were parental reported eczema at age 1 year, eczema at age 4 years, asthma at age 4 years, and, in a subgroup of 133 children, sensitization at age 4 years. RESULTS: In children of mothers with allergy, breast milk n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and the ratio between n-3 and n-6 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids were inversely associated with asthma and with persistent symptoms (eczema at age 1 year and eczema at age 4 years and/or asthma at age 4 years), but no associations between breast milk fatty acids and sensitization were observed. In children of mothers with allergy, also trans fatty acids tended to be inversely associated with allergic symptoms. In children of mothers without allergy, no associations between breast milk fatty acids and allergic symptoms were observed, but alpha-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) was positively associated with sensitization. CONCLUSION: In susceptible infants, the risk to develop allergic symptoms, but not the risk of sensitization, was modified by intake of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids through breast milk. SN - 0091-6749 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16461146/Breast_milk_fatty_acids_and_allergic_disease_in_preschool_children:_the_Prevention_and_Incidence_of_Asthma_and_Mite_Allergy_birth_cohort_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-6749(05)02316-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -