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Perception of electrocutaneous stimuli in irritable bowel syndrome.
Am J Gastroenterol. 2006 Mar; 101(3):596-603.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) are common conditions with some similarities, but different perceptual responses to somatic and visceral stimuli. The purpose of this study was to assess in a large group of IBS patients the somatic perception by transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and its relation to the level of severity and presence of FMS.

METHODS

In 99 patients grouped by the validated functional bowel disorder severity index (FBDSI) in mild, moderate, and severe IBS and in 33 healthy controls (HC), we studied discomfort thresholds and perception of somatic stimuli at control (hands and elbows) and active (trapezius) sites by TENS and by using a specific questionnaire.

RESULTS

The use of TENS showed that IBS showed significant higher thresholds and lower perception cumulative score compared to HC. The severity of IBS is significantly associated with age and mean control site values for discomfort and borderline associated with gender in the ordinal model constructed for the ascending series protocol. The severity of IBS is also significantly associated with the active cumulative perception score in the long stimulus protocol. Due to limited sample size of IBS men with FMS, analyses of discomfort thresholds and cumulative perception score by FMS were done only for women. IBS women without FMS had significantly higher mean control site values for discomfort and significantly lower active cumulative perception score than HC. IBS women with FMS had significantly lower mean active site values for discomfort thresholds than IBS women without FMS (Dunn's test p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

IBS patients showed somatic hypoalgesia to electrical stimuli. The severity of IBS and the presence of FMS influence the perception of somatic stimuli induced by TENS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Servizio di Endoscopia Digestiva, Università Federico II, via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16464229

Citation

Iovino, Paola, et al. "Perception of Electrocutaneous Stimuli in Irritable Bowel Syndrome." The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 101, no. 3, 2006, pp. 596-603.
Iovino P, Tremolaterra F, Consalvo D, et al. Perception of electrocutaneous stimuli in irritable bowel syndrome. Am J Gastroenterol. 2006;101(3):596-603.
Iovino, P., Tremolaterra, F., Consalvo, D., Sabbatini, F., Mazzacca, G., & Ciacci, C. (2006). Perception of electrocutaneous stimuli in irritable bowel syndrome. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 101(3), 596-603.
Iovino P, et al. Perception of Electrocutaneous Stimuli in Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Am J Gastroenterol. 2006;101(3):596-603. PubMed PMID: 16464229.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Perception of electrocutaneous stimuli in irritable bowel syndrome. AU - Iovino,Paola, AU - Tremolaterra,Fabrizio, AU - Consalvo,Danilo, AU - Sabbatini,Francesco, AU - Mazzacca,Gabriele, AU - Ciacci,Carolina, Y1 - 2006/02/08/ PY - 2006/2/9/pubmed PY - 2006/4/11/medline PY - 2006/2/9/entrez SP - 596 EP - 603 JF - The American journal of gastroenterology JO - Am J Gastroenterol VL - 101 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIM: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) are common conditions with some similarities, but different perceptual responses to somatic and visceral stimuli. The purpose of this study was to assess in a large group of IBS patients the somatic perception by transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and its relation to the level of severity and presence of FMS. METHODS: In 99 patients grouped by the validated functional bowel disorder severity index (FBDSI) in mild, moderate, and severe IBS and in 33 healthy controls (HC), we studied discomfort thresholds and perception of somatic stimuli at control (hands and elbows) and active (trapezius) sites by TENS and by using a specific questionnaire. RESULTS: The use of TENS showed that IBS showed significant higher thresholds and lower perception cumulative score compared to HC. The severity of IBS is significantly associated with age and mean control site values for discomfort and borderline associated with gender in the ordinal model constructed for the ascending series protocol. The severity of IBS is also significantly associated with the active cumulative perception score in the long stimulus protocol. Due to limited sample size of IBS men with FMS, analyses of discomfort thresholds and cumulative perception score by FMS were done only for women. IBS women without FMS had significantly higher mean control site values for discomfort and significantly lower active cumulative perception score than HC. IBS women with FMS had significantly lower mean active site values for discomfort thresholds than IBS women without FMS (Dunn's test p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: IBS patients showed somatic hypoalgesia to electrical stimuli. The severity of IBS and the presence of FMS influence the perception of somatic stimuli induced by TENS. SN - 0002-9270 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16464229/Perception_of_electrocutaneous_stimuli_in_irritable_bowel_syndrome_ L2 - https://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=16464229 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -