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Metabolic syndrome and the risk of stroke in middle-aged men.
Stroke 2006; 37(3):806-11S

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

The metabolic syndrome, a clustering of disturbed glucose and insulin metabolism, obesity and abdominal fat distribution, dyslipidemia, and hypertension is associated with cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of metabolic syndrome, as defined by National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) and World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, with the risk for stroke.

METHODS

Population-based cohort study with an average follow-up of 14.3 years from eastern Finland. A total of 1131 men with no history of cardiovascular disease and diabetes at baseline participated. Sixty-five strokes occurred, of which 47 were ischemic strokes.

RESULTS

Men with the metabolic syndrome as defined by the NCEP criteria had a 2.05-fold (95% CI, 1.03 to 4.11; P=0.042) risk for all strokes and 2.41-fold (95% CI, 1.12 to 5.32; P=0.025) risk for ischemic stroke, after adjusting for socioeconomic status, smoking, alcohol, and family history of coronary heart disease. Additional adjustment for ischemic changes during exercise test, serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, plasma fibrinogen, energy intake for saturated fats, energy expenditure of leisure time physical activity, and white blood cell count, the results remained significant. The risk ratios among men with metabolic syndrome as defined by the WHO criteria were 1.82 (95% CI, 1.01 to 3.26; P=0.046) for all strokes and 2.16 (95% CI, 1.11 to 4.19; P=0.022) for ischemic stroke. After further adjustment, the respective risks were 2.08 (95% CI, 1.12 to 3.87; P=0.020) and 2.47 (95% CI, 1.21 to 5.07; P=0.013).

CONCLUSIONS

The risk of any stroke is increased in men with metabolic syndrome, in the absence of stroke, diabetes and cardiovascular disease at baseline. Prevention of the metabolic syndrome presents a great challenge for clinicians with respect to stroke.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Research Institute of Public Health, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland. sudhir.kurl@uku.fiNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16469958

Citation

Kurl, Sudhir, et al. "Metabolic Syndrome and the Risk of Stroke in Middle-aged Men." Stroke, vol. 37, no. 3, 2006, pp. 806-11.
Kurl S, Laukkanen JA, Niskanen L, et al. Metabolic syndrome and the risk of stroke in middle-aged men. Stroke. 2006;37(3):806-11.
Kurl, S., Laukkanen, J. A., Niskanen, L., Laaksonen, D., Sivenius, J., Nyyssönen, K., & Salonen, J. T. (2006). Metabolic syndrome and the risk of stroke in middle-aged men. Stroke, 37(3), pp. 806-11.
Kurl S, et al. Metabolic Syndrome and the Risk of Stroke in Middle-aged Men. Stroke. 2006;37(3):806-11. PubMed PMID: 16469958.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Metabolic syndrome and the risk of stroke in middle-aged men. AU - Kurl,Sudhir, AU - Laukkanen,Jari A, AU - Niskanen,Leo, AU - Laaksonen,David, AU - Sivenius,Juhani, AU - Nyyssönen,Kristiina, AU - Salonen,Jukka T, Y1 - 2006/02/09/ PY - 2006/2/14/pubmed PY - 2006/3/24/medline PY - 2006/2/14/entrez SP - 806 EP - 11 JF - Stroke JO - Stroke VL - 37 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The metabolic syndrome, a clustering of disturbed glucose and insulin metabolism, obesity and abdominal fat distribution, dyslipidemia, and hypertension is associated with cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of metabolic syndrome, as defined by National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) and World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, with the risk for stroke. METHODS: Population-based cohort study with an average follow-up of 14.3 years from eastern Finland. A total of 1131 men with no history of cardiovascular disease and diabetes at baseline participated. Sixty-five strokes occurred, of which 47 were ischemic strokes. RESULTS: Men with the metabolic syndrome as defined by the NCEP criteria had a 2.05-fold (95% CI, 1.03 to 4.11; P=0.042) risk for all strokes and 2.41-fold (95% CI, 1.12 to 5.32; P=0.025) risk for ischemic stroke, after adjusting for socioeconomic status, smoking, alcohol, and family history of coronary heart disease. Additional adjustment for ischemic changes during exercise test, serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, plasma fibrinogen, energy intake for saturated fats, energy expenditure of leisure time physical activity, and white blood cell count, the results remained significant. The risk ratios among men with metabolic syndrome as defined by the WHO criteria were 1.82 (95% CI, 1.01 to 3.26; P=0.046) for all strokes and 2.16 (95% CI, 1.11 to 4.19; P=0.022) for ischemic stroke. After further adjustment, the respective risks were 2.08 (95% CI, 1.12 to 3.87; P=0.020) and 2.47 (95% CI, 1.21 to 5.07; P=0.013). CONCLUSIONS: The risk of any stroke is increased in men with metabolic syndrome, in the absence of stroke, diabetes and cardiovascular disease at baseline. Prevention of the metabolic syndrome presents a great challenge for clinicians with respect to stroke. SN - 1524-4628 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16469958/Metabolic_syndrome_and_the_risk_of_stroke_in_middle_aged_men_ L2 - http://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/01.STR.0000204354.06965.44?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -