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Preservation of quality of life after intensity-modulated radiotherapy for early-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma: results of a prospective longitudinal study.
Head Neck. 2006 Aug; 28(8):712-22.HN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Xerostomia is a ubiquitous complication after conventional radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) that seriously impairs patient quality of life (QOL). The effect on QOL of parotid-sparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for early-stage NPC was assessed prospectively.

METHODS

Thirty-two patients with T1-2,N0-1,M0 NPC received IMRT. Saliva flow was measured, and the Medical Outcomes Short Form 36 (SF-36), European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) core, and EORTC head and neck module (QLQ-H&N35) questionnaires were completed at baseline and 2, 6, and 12 months after IMRT.

RESULTS

Saliva flow recovered to at least 25% of baseline in most cases after 1 year. Physical function, fatigue, and vitality were problems at 2 months and then resolved (p < or = .002). Global health scales showed continuous improvement in QOL after treatment (p < or = .004). Xerostomia and sticky saliva were problems 2 months after treatment; thereafter, continuous improvement occurred (p < or = .001). Xerostomia scores correlated with general aspects of QOL (p < or = .044).

CONCLUSION

IMRT for early-stage disease preserved key aspects of QOL, and a reduction in xerostomia symptoms enhanced broader aspects of QOL.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Oral Rehabilitation, Faculty of Dentistry, the University of Hong Kong, 34 Hospital Road, Hong Kong, SAR. annemcmillan@hku.hkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16475203

Citation

McMillan, Anne S., et al. "Preservation of Quality of Life After Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy for Early-stage Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Results of a Prospective Longitudinal Study." Head & Neck, vol. 28, no. 8, 2006, pp. 712-22.
McMillan AS, Pow EH, Kwong DL, et al. Preservation of quality of life after intensity-modulated radiotherapy for early-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma: results of a prospective longitudinal study. Head Neck. 2006;28(8):712-22.
McMillan, A. S., Pow, E. H., Kwong, D. L., Wong, M. C., Sham, J. S., Leung, L. H., & Leung, W. K. (2006). Preservation of quality of life after intensity-modulated radiotherapy for early-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma: results of a prospective longitudinal study. Head & Neck, 28(8), 712-22.
McMillan AS, et al. Preservation of Quality of Life After Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy for Early-stage Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Results of a Prospective Longitudinal Study. Head Neck. 2006;28(8):712-22. PubMed PMID: 16475203.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Preservation of quality of life after intensity-modulated radiotherapy for early-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma: results of a prospective longitudinal study. AU - McMillan,Anne S, AU - Pow,Edmond H N, AU - Kwong,Dora L W, AU - Wong,May C M, AU - Sham,Jonathan S T, AU - Leung,Lucullus H T, AU - Leung,W Keung, PY - 2006/2/14/pubmed PY - 2006/12/9/medline PY - 2006/2/14/entrez SP - 712 EP - 22 JF - Head & neck JO - Head Neck VL - 28 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Xerostomia is a ubiquitous complication after conventional radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) that seriously impairs patient quality of life (QOL). The effect on QOL of parotid-sparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for early-stage NPC was assessed prospectively. METHODS: Thirty-two patients with T1-2,N0-1,M0 NPC received IMRT. Saliva flow was measured, and the Medical Outcomes Short Form 36 (SF-36), European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) core, and EORTC head and neck module (QLQ-H&N35) questionnaires were completed at baseline and 2, 6, and 12 months after IMRT. RESULTS: Saliva flow recovered to at least 25% of baseline in most cases after 1 year. Physical function, fatigue, and vitality were problems at 2 months and then resolved (p < or = .002). Global health scales showed continuous improvement in QOL after treatment (p < or = .004). Xerostomia and sticky saliva were problems 2 months after treatment; thereafter, continuous improvement occurred (p < or = .001). Xerostomia scores correlated with general aspects of QOL (p < or = .044). CONCLUSION: IMRT for early-stage disease preserved key aspects of QOL, and a reduction in xerostomia symptoms enhanced broader aspects of QOL. SN - 1043-3074 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16475203/Preservation_of_quality_of_life_after_intensity_modulated_radiotherapy_for_early_stage_nasopharyngeal_carcinoma:_results_of_a_prospective_longitudinal_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/hed.20378 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -