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Optimal dietary habits for the prevention of stroke.

Abstract

Diet may influence stroke risk via several mechanisms, but the optimal dietary habits for stroke prevention are not well established. We reviewed English-language MEDLINE publications from January 1979 through November 2004 for experimental, observational, and clinical studies of dietary factors (minerals, fats, cholesterol, fish, animal protein, fiber, whole grains, carbohydrate quality, fruits and vegetables, antioxidants, B vitamins, dietary patterns) and risk of stroke or hypertension, the principal modifiable stroke risk factor. A total of 121 publications were selected based on relevance and quality of design and methods. Diets low in sodium and high in potassium lower blood pressure which will likely reduce stroke risk. Consumption of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, folate, and fatty fish are each likely to reduce stroke risk. A prudent or traditional Mediterranean dietary pattern, which incorporates these individual dietary components as well as intake of legumes and olive oil, may also prevent stroke. Evidence is limited or inconsistent regarding optimal levels of dietary magnesium, calcium, antioxidants, total fat, other fat subtypes, cholesterol, carbohydrate quality, or animal protein for stroke prevention. A diet low in sodium, high in potassium, and rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, cereal fiber, and fatty fish will likely reduce the incidence of stroke. Further research is needed regarding the possible effects of other major dietary factors on stroke risk.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

    Source

    Seminars in neurology 26:1 2006 Feb pg 11-23

    MeSH

    Animals
    Antioxidants
    Cholesterol, Dietary
    Clinical Trials as Topic
    Diet
    Dietary Carbohydrates
    Dietary Fats
    Dietary Fiber
    Dietary Proteins
    Edible Grain
    Feeding Behavior
    Fishes
    Fruit
    Humans
    Meat
    Minerals
    Risk
    Stroke
    Vegetables

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16479440

    Citation

    Ding, Eric L., and Dariush Mozaffarian. "Optimal Dietary Habits for the Prevention of Stroke." Seminars in Neurology, vol. 26, no. 1, 2006, pp. 11-23.
    Ding EL, Mozaffarian D. Optimal dietary habits for the prevention of stroke. Semin Neurol. 2006;26(1):11-23.
    Ding, E. L., & Mozaffarian, D. (2006). Optimal dietary habits for the prevention of stroke. Seminars in Neurology, 26(1), pp. 11-23.
    Ding EL, Mozaffarian D. Optimal Dietary Habits for the Prevention of Stroke. Semin Neurol. 2006;26(1):11-23. PubMed PMID: 16479440.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Optimal dietary habits for the prevention of stroke. AU - Ding,Eric L, AU - Mozaffarian,Dariush, PY - 2006/2/16/pubmed PY - 2006/3/30/medline PY - 2006/2/16/entrez SP - 11 EP - 23 JF - Seminars in neurology JO - Semin Neurol VL - 26 IS - 1 N2 - Diet may influence stroke risk via several mechanisms, but the optimal dietary habits for stroke prevention are not well established. We reviewed English-language MEDLINE publications from January 1979 through November 2004 for experimental, observational, and clinical studies of dietary factors (minerals, fats, cholesterol, fish, animal protein, fiber, whole grains, carbohydrate quality, fruits and vegetables, antioxidants, B vitamins, dietary patterns) and risk of stroke or hypertension, the principal modifiable stroke risk factor. A total of 121 publications were selected based on relevance and quality of design and methods. Diets low in sodium and high in potassium lower blood pressure which will likely reduce stroke risk. Consumption of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, folate, and fatty fish are each likely to reduce stroke risk. A prudent or traditional Mediterranean dietary pattern, which incorporates these individual dietary components as well as intake of legumes and olive oil, may also prevent stroke. Evidence is limited or inconsistent regarding optimal levels of dietary magnesium, calcium, antioxidants, total fat, other fat subtypes, cholesterol, carbohydrate quality, or animal protein for stroke prevention. A diet low in sodium, high in potassium, and rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, cereal fiber, and fatty fish will likely reduce the incidence of stroke. Further research is needed regarding the possible effects of other major dietary factors on stroke risk. SN - 0271-8235 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16479440/full_citation L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-2006-933305 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -