Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Review article: safe amounts of gluten for patients with wheat allergy or coeliac disease.
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2006 Mar 01; 23(5):559-75.AP

Abstract

For both wheat allergy and coeliac disease the dietary avoidance of wheat and other gluten-containing cereals is the only effective treatment. Estimation of the maximum tolerated amount of gluten for susceptible individuals would support effective management of their disease. Literature was reviewed to evaluate whether an upper limit for gluten content in food, which would be safe for sufferers from both diseases, could be identified. When setting gluten limits for coeliac disease sufferers, the overall potential daily intake should be considered, while for wheat allergy limits should be based on single servings. For coeliac disease sufferers this limit should lie between 10 and 100 mg daily intake. For wheat allergy, lowest eliciting doses for children lie in the lower milligram range, while for adults they are most significantly higher. Gliadins (part of the gluten proteins) not only trigger coeliac disease, but are also major allergens in wheat allergy. Therefore, measurement of gliadins with validated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods provides an appropriate marker for assessing gluten and/or wheat protein contents in food. Available data suggest that a maximum gluten content for 'gluten-free' foods could be set, which protects both wheat allergy sufferers and coeliac patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nestlé, Nestec Quality Management, Vevey, Switzerland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16480395

Citation

Hischenhuber, C, et al. "Review Article: Safe Amounts of Gluten for Patients With Wheat Allergy or Coeliac Disease." Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, vol. 23, no. 5, 2006, pp. 559-75.
Hischenhuber C, Crevel R, Jarry B, et al. Review article: safe amounts of gluten for patients with wheat allergy or coeliac disease. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2006;23(5):559-75.
Hischenhuber, C., Crevel, R., Jarry, B., Mäki, M., Moneret-Vautrin, D. A., Romano, A., Troncone, R., & Ward, R. (2006). Review article: safe amounts of gluten for patients with wheat allergy or coeliac disease. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 23(5), 559-75.
Hischenhuber C, et al. Review Article: Safe Amounts of Gluten for Patients With Wheat Allergy or Coeliac Disease. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2006 Mar 1;23(5):559-75. PubMed PMID: 16480395.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Review article: safe amounts of gluten for patients with wheat allergy or coeliac disease. AU - Hischenhuber,C, AU - Crevel,R, AU - Jarry,B, AU - Mäki,M, AU - Moneret-Vautrin,D A, AU - Romano,A, AU - Troncone,R, AU - Ward,R, PY - 2006/2/17/pubmed PY - 2006/6/30/medline PY - 2006/2/17/entrez SP - 559 EP - 75 JF - Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics JO - Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther. VL - 23 IS - 5 N2 - For both wheat allergy and coeliac disease the dietary avoidance of wheat and other gluten-containing cereals is the only effective treatment. Estimation of the maximum tolerated amount of gluten for susceptible individuals would support effective management of their disease. Literature was reviewed to evaluate whether an upper limit for gluten content in food, which would be safe for sufferers from both diseases, could be identified. When setting gluten limits for coeliac disease sufferers, the overall potential daily intake should be considered, while for wheat allergy limits should be based on single servings. For coeliac disease sufferers this limit should lie between 10 and 100 mg daily intake. For wheat allergy, lowest eliciting doses for children lie in the lower milligram range, while for adults they are most significantly higher. Gliadins (part of the gluten proteins) not only trigger coeliac disease, but are also major allergens in wheat allergy. Therefore, measurement of gliadins with validated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods provides an appropriate marker for assessing gluten and/or wheat protein contents in food. Available data suggest that a maximum gluten content for 'gluten-free' foods could be set, which protects both wheat allergy sufferers and coeliac patients. SN - 0269-2813 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16480395/Review_article:_safe_amounts_of_gluten_for_patients_with_wheat_allergy_or_coeliac_disease_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2036.2006.02768.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -