Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Comparison of parental report of blood lead testing in children enrolled in Medicaid with Medicaid claims data and blood lead surveillance reports.
J Community Health. 2006 Feb; 31(1):43-55.JC

Abstract

The purposes of this study were to identify the congruence of blood lead testing based on parental self-reports with Medicaid claims and blood lead surveillance records, and to determine factors associated with agreement between parental reports of blood lead tests and Medicaid claims or blood lead surveillance records. Data were obtained from a cross-sectional mailed survey of a randomly selected sample of parents of children 1-2 years old enrolled in Medicaid (n=532) and from existing Medicaid claims and blood lead surveillance records. Fifty-six percent of survey respondents reported their child had a blood lead test completed. Of these, only 56% could be confirmed with Medicaid claims/blood lead surveillance data. Logistic regression analysis revealed the odds of blood lead testing per parental report confirmed with Medicaid claims/blood lead surveillance data were 2.6 times greater if the child had > or =3 provider visits, 2.5 times greater if parents reported receiving a reminder about blood lead testing, 2.2 times greater if parents reported receiving information about lead poisoning, 1.6 times greater if residing in an urban county, and 1.5 times greater if the child was more than 2 years old. In conclusion, parents are not always aware if their child had a blood lead test. Information and reminders about blood lead testing should be distributed to parents of young children enrolled in Medicaid and frequently reviewed by healthcare providers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Ohio State University College of Nursing, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA. polivka.1@osu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16482765

Citation

Polivka, Barbara J., et al. "Comparison of Parental Report of Blood Lead Testing in Children Enrolled in Medicaid With Medicaid Claims Data and Blood Lead Surveillance Reports." Journal of Community Health, vol. 31, no. 1, 2006, pp. 43-55.
Polivka BJ, Salsberry P, Casavant MJ, et al. Comparison of parental report of blood lead testing in children enrolled in Medicaid with Medicaid claims data and blood lead surveillance reports. J Community Health. 2006;31(1):43-55.
Polivka, B. J., Salsberry, P., Casavant, M. J., Chaudry, R. V., & Bush, D. C. (2006). Comparison of parental report of blood lead testing in children enrolled in Medicaid with Medicaid claims data and blood lead surveillance reports. Journal of Community Health, 31(1), 43-55.
Polivka BJ, et al. Comparison of Parental Report of Blood Lead Testing in Children Enrolled in Medicaid With Medicaid Claims Data and Blood Lead Surveillance Reports. J Community Health. 2006;31(1):43-55. PubMed PMID: 16482765.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparison of parental report of blood lead testing in children enrolled in Medicaid with Medicaid claims data and blood lead surveillance reports. AU - Polivka,Barbara J, AU - Salsberry,Pamela, AU - Casavant,Marcel J, AU - Chaudry,Rosemary V, AU - Bush,Donna C, PY - 2006/2/18/pubmed PY - 2006/4/28/medline PY - 2006/2/18/entrez SP - 43 EP - 55 JF - Journal of community health JO - J Community Health VL - 31 IS - 1 N2 - The purposes of this study were to identify the congruence of blood lead testing based on parental self-reports with Medicaid claims and blood lead surveillance records, and to determine factors associated with agreement between parental reports of blood lead tests and Medicaid claims or blood lead surveillance records. Data were obtained from a cross-sectional mailed survey of a randomly selected sample of parents of children 1-2 years old enrolled in Medicaid (n=532) and from existing Medicaid claims and blood lead surveillance records. Fifty-six percent of survey respondents reported their child had a blood lead test completed. Of these, only 56% could be confirmed with Medicaid claims/blood lead surveillance data. Logistic regression analysis revealed the odds of blood lead testing per parental report confirmed with Medicaid claims/blood lead surveillance data were 2.6 times greater if the child had > or =3 provider visits, 2.5 times greater if parents reported receiving a reminder about blood lead testing, 2.2 times greater if parents reported receiving information about lead poisoning, 1.6 times greater if residing in an urban county, and 1.5 times greater if the child was more than 2 years old. In conclusion, parents are not always aware if their child had a blood lead test. Information and reminders about blood lead testing should be distributed to parents of young children enrolled in Medicaid and frequently reviewed by healthcare providers. SN - 0094-5145 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16482765/Comparison_of_parental_report_of_blood_lead_testing_in_children_enrolled_in_Medicaid_with_Medicaid_claims_data_and_blood_lead_surveillance_reports_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=16482765.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -