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Intermittent microclimate cooling during exercise-heat stress in US army chemical protective clothing.
Ergonomics. 2006 Feb 10; 49(2):209-19.E

Abstract

The effectiveness of intermittent, microclimate cooling for men who worked in US Army chemical protective clothing (modified mission-oriented protective posture level 3; MOPP 3) was examined. The hypothesis was that intermittent cooling on a 2 min on-off schedule using a liquid cooling garment (LCG) covering 72% of the body surface area would reduce heat strain comparably to constant cooling. Four male subjects completed three experiments at 30 degrees C, 30% relative humidity wearing the LCG under the MOPP 3 during 80 min of treadmill walking at 224 +/- 5 W . m(-2). Water temperature to the LCG was held constant at 21 degrees C. The experiments were; 1) constant cooling (CC); 2) intermittent cooling at 2-min intervals (IC); 3) no cooling (NC). Core temperature increased (1.6 +/- 0.2 degrees C) in NC, which was greater than IC (0.5 +/- 0.2 degrees C) and CC (0.5 +/- 0.3 degrees C) (p < 0.05). Mean skin temperature was higher during NC (36.1 +/- 0.4 degrees C) than IC (33.7 +/- 0.6 degrees C) and CC (32.6 +/- 0.6 degrees C) and mean skin temperature was higher during IC than CC (p < 0.05). Mean heart rate during NC (139 +/- 9 b . min(-1)) was greater than IC (110 +/- 10 b . min(-1)) and CC (107 +/- 9 b . min(-1)) (p < 0.05). Cooling by conduction (K) during NC (94 +/- 4 W . m(-2)) was lower than IC (142 +/- 7 W . m(-2)) and CC (146 +/- 4 W . m(-2)) (p < 0.05). These findings suggest that IC provided a favourable skin to LCG gradient for heat dissipation by conduction and reduced heat strain comparable to CC during exercise-heat stress in chemical protective clothing.

Authors+Show Affiliations

U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Kansas St., Natick, MA 01760-5007, USA. bruce.cadarette@us.army.milNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16484146

Citation

Cadarette, Bruce S., et al. "Intermittent Microclimate Cooling During Exercise-heat Stress in US Army Chemical Protective Clothing." Ergonomics, vol. 49, no. 2, 2006, pp. 209-19.
Cadarette BS, Cheuvront SN, Kolka MA, et al. Intermittent microclimate cooling during exercise-heat stress in US army chemical protective clothing. Ergonomics. 2006;49(2):209-19.
Cadarette, B. S., Cheuvront, S. N., Kolka, M. A., Stephenson, L. A., Montain, S. J., & Sawka, M. N. (2006). Intermittent microclimate cooling during exercise-heat stress in US army chemical protective clothing. Ergonomics, 49(2), 209-19.
Cadarette BS, et al. Intermittent Microclimate Cooling During Exercise-heat Stress in US Army Chemical Protective Clothing. Ergonomics. 2006 Feb 10;49(2):209-19. PubMed PMID: 16484146.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intermittent microclimate cooling during exercise-heat stress in US army chemical protective clothing. AU - Cadarette,Bruce S, AU - Cheuvront,Samuel N, AU - Kolka,Margaret A, AU - Stephenson,Lou A, AU - Montain,Scott J, AU - Sawka,Michael N, PY - 2006/2/18/pubmed PY - 2006/4/29/medline PY - 2006/2/18/entrez SP - 209 EP - 19 JF - Ergonomics JO - Ergonomics VL - 49 IS - 2 N2 - The effectiveness of intermittent, microclimate cooling for men who worked in US Army chemical protective clothing (modified mission-oriented protective posture level 3; MOPP 3) was examined. The hypothesis was that intermittent cooling on a 2 min on-off schedule using a liquid cooling garment (LCG) covering 72% of the body surface area would reduce heat strain comparably to constant cooling. Four male subjects completed three experiments at 30 degrees C, 30% relative humidity wearing the LCG under the MOPP 3 during 80 min of treadmill walking at 224 +/- 5 W . m(-2). Water temperature to the LCG was held constant at 21 degrees C. The experiments were; 1) constant cooling (CC); 2) intermittent cooling at 2-min intervals (IC); 3) no cooling (NC). Core temperature increased (1.6 +/- 0.2 degrees C) in NC, which was greater than IC (0.5 +/- 0.2 degrees C) and CC (0.5 +/- 0.3 degrees C) (p < 0.05). Mean skin temperature was higher during NC (36.1 +/- 0.4 degrees C) than IC (33.7 +/- 0.6 degrees C) and CC (32.6 +/- 0.6 degrees C) and mean skin temperature was higher during IC than CC (p < 0.05). Mean heart rate during NC (139 +/- 9 b . min(-1)) was greater than IC (110 +/- 10 b . min(-1)) and CC (107 +/- 9 b . min(-1)) (p < 0.05). Cooling by conduction (K) during NC (94 +/- 4 W . m(-2)) was lower than IC (142 +/- 7 W . m(-2)) and CC (146 +/- 4 W . m(-2)) (p < 0.05). These findings suggest that IC provided a favourable skin to LCG gradient for heat dissipation by conduction and reduced heat strain comparable to CC during exercise-heat stress in chemical protective clothing. SN - 0014-0139 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16484146/Intermittent_microclimate_cooling_during_exercise_heat_stress_in_US_army_chemical_protective_clothing_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00140130500436106 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -