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Preclinical perspectives on garlic and cancer.

Abstract

Evidence continues to point to the anticancer properties of fresh garlic extracts, aged garlic, garlic oil, and a number of specific organosulfur compounds generated by processing garlic. These anticarcinogenic and antitumorigenic characteristics appear to arise through both dose- and temporal-related changes in a number of cellular events involved with the cancer process, including those involving drug metabolism, immunocompetence, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. The ability of garlic and related allyl sulfur compounds to block tumors in the colon, lung, breast, and liver suggests general mechanisms that are not tissue specific. Whereas relatively few studies have compared the relative efficacy of water- and lipid-soluble allyl sulfur compounds, those that have when using chemically induced carcinogen models suggest little difference in response, whereas tumor proliferation/apoptosis is highly dependent on the species provided. A shift in sulfhydryl groups, alterations in glutathione:oxidized glutathione ratios, and resultant changes in cellular redox status may be involved in some of the phenotypic changes caused by allyl sulfur compounds. Such changes in thiols by allyl sulfurs may also account for the observed hyperphosphorylation of specific cell cycle proteins and the histone hyperacetylation that has been correlated with suppressed tumor cell proliferation. Whereas the anticarcinogenic and antitumorigenic data to date are impressive, additional studies are needed with more modest exposure to allyl sulfur compounds over prolonged periods. Likewise, additional studies are needed that incorporate transgenic and knockout models to assist in the identification of molecular targets for garlic and its associated allyl sulfur components.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    Nutritional Science Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD 20854, USA. milnerj@mail.nih.gov

    Source

    The Journal of nutrition 136:3 Suppl 2006 03 pg 827S-831S

    MeSH

    Allyl Compounds
    Animals
    Anticarcinogenic Agents
    Antineoplastic Agents
    Disulfides
    Garlic
    Neoplasms, Experimental
    Phytotherapy
    Plant Extracts

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16484574

    Citation

    Milner, John A.. "Preclinical Perspectives On Garlic and Cancer." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 136, no. 3 Suppl, 2006, 827S-831S.
    Milner JA. Preclinical perspectives on garlic and cancer. J Nutr. 2006;136(3 Suppl):827S-831S.
    Milner, J. A. (2006). Preclinical perspectives on garlic and cancer. The Journal of Nutrition, 136(3 Suppl), 827S-831S. doi:10.1093/jn/136.3.727S.
    Milner JA. Preclinical Perspectives On Garlic and Cancer. J Nutr. 2006;136(3 Suppl):827S-831S. PubMed PMID: 16484574.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Preclinical perspectives on garlic and cancer. A1 - Milner,John A, PY - 2006/2/18/pubmed PY - 2006/5/4/medline PY - 2006/2/18/entrez SP - 827S EP - 831S JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 136 IS - 3 Suppl N2 - Evidence continues to point to the anticancer properties of fresh garlic extracts, aged garlic, garlic oil, and a number of specific organosulfur compounds generated by processing garlic. These anticarcinogenic and antitumorigenic characteristics appear to arise through both dose- and temporal-related changes in a number of cellular events involved with the cancer process, including those involving drug metabolism, immunocompetence, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. The ability of garlic and related allyl sulfur compounds to block tumors in the colon, lung, breast, and liver suggests general mechanisms that are not tissue specific. Whereas relatively few studies have compared the relative efficacy of water- and lipid-soluble allyl sulfur compounds, those that have when using chemically induced carcinogen models suggest little difference in response, whereas tumor proliferation/apoptosis is highly dependent on the species provided. A shift in sulfhydryl groups, alterations in glutathione:oxidized glutathione ratios, and resultant changes in cellular redox status may be involved in some of the phenotypic changes caused by allyl sulfur compounds. Such changes in thiols by allyl sulfurs may also account for the observed hyperphosphorylation of specific cell cycle proteins and the histone hyperacetylation that has been correlated with suppressed tumor cell proliferation. Whereas the anticarcinogenic and antitumorigenic data to date are impressive, additional studies are needed with more modest exposure to allyl sulfur compounds over prolonged periods. Likewise, additional studies are needed that incorporate transgenic and knockout models to assist in the identification of molecular targets for garlic and its associated allyl sulfur components. SN - 0022-3166 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16484574/Preclinical_perspectives_on_garlic_and_cancer_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jn/136.3.727S DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -