Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A pooled analysis of 12 cohort studies of dietary fat, cholesterol and egg intake and ovarian cancer.
Cancer Causes Control 2006; 17(3):273-85CC

Abstract

Fat and cholesterol are theorized to promote ovarian carcinogenesis by increasing circulating estrogen levels. Although case-control studies have reported positive associations between total and saturated fat intake and ovarian cancer risk, two cohort studies have observed null associations. Dietary cholesterol and eggs have been positively associated with ovarian cancer risk. A pooled analysis was conducted on 12 cohort studies. Among 523,217 women, 2,132 incident epithelial ovarian cancer cases were identified. Study-specific relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by Cox proportional hazards models, and then pooled using a random effects model. Total fat intake was not associated with ovarian cancer risk (pooled multivariate RR = 1.08, 95% CI 0.86-1.34 comparing > or =45 to 30-<35% of calories). No association was observed for monounsaturated, polyunsaturated, trans-unsaturated, animal and vegetable fat, cholesterol and egg intakes with ovarian cancer risk. A weakly positive, but non-linear association, was observed for saturated fat intake (pooled multivariate RR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.01-1.66 comparing highest versus lowest decile). Results for histologic subtypes were similar. Overall, fat, cholesterol and egg intakes were not associated with ovarian cancer risk. The positive association for saturated fat intake at very high intakes merits further investigation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. pooling@hsphsun2.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16489535

Citation

Genkinger, Jeanine M., et al. "A Pooled Analysis of 12 Cohort Studies of Dietary Fat, Cholesterol and Egg Intake and Ovarian Cancer." Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, vol. 17, no. 3, 2006, pp. 273-85.
Genkinger JM, Hunter DJ, Spiegelman D, et al. A pooled analysis of 12 cohort studies of dietary fat, cholesterol and egg intake and ovarian cancer. Cancer Causes Control. 2006;17(3):273-85.
Genkinger, J. M., Hunter, D. J., Spiegelman, D., Anderson, K. E., Beeson, W. L., Buring, J. E., ... Smith-Warner, S. A. (2006). A pooled analysis of 12 cohort studies of dietary fat, cholesterol and egg intake and ovarian cancer. Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, 17(3), pp. 273-85.
Genkinger JM, et al. A Pooled Analysis of 12 Cohort Studies of Dietary Fat, Cholesterol and Egg Intake and Ovarian Cancer. Cancer Causes Control. 2006;17(3):273-85. PubMed PMID: 16489535.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A pooled analysis of 12 cohort studies of dietary fat, cholesterol and egg intake and ovarian cancer. AU - Genkinger,Jeanine M, AU - Hunter,David J, AU - Spiegelman,Donna, AU - Anderson,Kristin E, AU - Beeson,W Lawrence, AU - Buring,Julie E, AU - Colditz,Graham A, AU - Fraser,Gary E, AU - Freudenheim,Jo L, AU - Goldbohm,R Alexandra, AU - Hankinson,Susan E, AU - Koenig,Karen L, AU - Larsson,Susanna C, AU - Leitzmann,Michael, AU - McCullough,Marjorie L, AU - Miller,Anthony B, AU - Rodriguez,Carmen, AU - Rohan,Thomas E, AU - Ross,Julie A, AU - Schatzkin,Arthur, AU - Schouten,Leo J, AU - Smit,Ellen, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Wolk,Alicja, AU - Zeleniuch-Jacquotte,Anne, AU - Zhang,Shumin M, AU - Smith-Warner,Stephanie A, PY - 2005/06/20/received PY - 2005/09/23/accepted PY - 2006/2/21/pubmed PY - 2006/9/30/medline PY - 2006/2/21/entrez SP - 273 EP - 85 JF - Cancer causes & control : CCC JO - Cancer Causes Control VL - 17 IS - 3 N2 - Fat and cholesterol are theorized to promote ovarian carcinogenesis by increasing circulating estrogen levels. Although case-control studies have reported positive associations between total and saturated fat intake and ovarian cancer risk, two cohort studies have observed null associations. Dietary cholesterol and eggs have been positively associated with ovarian cancer risk. A pooled analysis was conducted on 12 cohort studies. Among 523,217 women, 2,132 incident epithelial ovarian cancer cases were identified. Study-specific relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by Cox proportional hazards models, and then pooled using a random effects model. Total fat intake was not associated with ovarian cancer risk (pooled multivariate RR = 1.08, 95% CI 0.86-1.34 comparing > or =45 to 30-<35% of calories). No association was observed for monounsaturated, polyunsaturated, trans-unsaturated, animal and vegetable fat, cholesterol and egg intakes with ovarian cancer risk. A weakly positive, but non-linear association, was observed for saturated fat intake (pooled multivariate RR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.01-1.66 comparing highest versus lowest decile). Results for histologic subtypes were similar. Overall, fat, cholesterol and egg intakes were not associated with ovarian cancer risk. The positive association for saturated fat intake at very high intakes merits further investigation. SN - 0957-5243 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16489535/A_pooled_analysis_of_12_cohort_studies_of_dietary_fat_cholesterol_and_egg_intake_and_ovarian_cancer_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-005-0455-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -