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Correlates of beverage intake in adolescent girls: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study.
J Pediatr. 2006 Feb; 148(2):183-7.JPed

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To examine longitudinal changes in consumption of 6 types of beverages (milk, diet and regular soda, fruit juice, fruit-flavored drinks, and coffee/tea) in girls and determine the relationship between beverage intake, body mass index (BMI), and nutrient intake.

STUDY DESIGN

Three-day food diaries were included from black (1210) and white (1161) girls who participated in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study. Diaries were recorded during annual visits beginning at ages 9 or 10 years until age 19 years. Mixed models estimated the association of (1) visit and race with average daily consumption of beverages and (2) beverage intake with BMI and average daily intake of total calories, sucrose, fructose, total sugars, and calcium.

RESULTS

For girls of both races, milk consumption decreased and soda consumption increased with time. Changes in beverage intake with time varied by race for all beverages except fruit juice. For all beverage categories, consumption was associated with caloric intake. Of all beverages, increasing soda consumption predicted the greatest increase of BMI and the lowest increase in calcium intake.

CONCLUSIONS

Public health efforts are needed to help adolescents gain access to and choose healthful beverages and decrease intake of beverages of minimal nutritional value.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Wesleyan University, 207 High Street, Middletown, CT 06459-0408, USA. rstriegel@wesleyan.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16492426

Citation

Striegel-Moore, Ruth H., et al. "Correlates of Beverage Intake in Adolescent Girls: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study." The Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 148, no. 2, 2006, pp. 183-7.
Striegel-Moore RH, Thompson D, Affenito SG, et al. Correlates of beverage intake in adolescent girls: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study. J Pediatr. 2006;148(2):183-7.
Striegel-Moore, R. H., Thompson, D., Affenito, S. G., Franko, D. L., Obarzanek, E., Barton, B. A., Schreiber, G. B., Daniels, S. R., Schmidt, M., & Crawford, P. B. (2006). Correlates of beverage intake in adolescent girls: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study. The Journal of Pediatrics, 148(2), 183-7.
Striegel-Moore RH, et al. Correlates of Beverage Intake in Adolescent Girls: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study. J Pediatr. 2006;148(2):183-7. PubMed PMID: 16492426.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Correlates of beverage intake in adolescent girls: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study. AU - Striegel-Moore,Ruth H, AU - Thompson,Douglas, AU - Affenito,Sandra G, AU - Franko,Debra L, AU - Obarzanek,Eva, AU - Barton,Bruce A, AU - Schreiber,George B, AU - Daniels,Stephen R, AU - Schmidt,Marcia, AU - Crawford,Patricia B, PY - 2005/06/01/received PY - 2005/09/20/revised PY - 2005/11/04/accepted PY - 2006/2/24/pubmed PY - 2006/4/21/medline PY - 2006/2/24/entrez SP - 183 EP - 7 JF - The Journal of pediatrics JO - J Pediatr VL - 148 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To examine longitudinal changes in consumption of 6 types of beverages (milk, diet and regular soda, fruit juice, fruit-flavored drinks, and coffee/tea) in girls and determine the relationship between beverage intake, body mass index (BMI), and nutrient intake. STUDY DESIGN: Three-day food diaries were included from black (1210) and white (1161) girls who participated in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study. Diaries were recorded during annual visits beginning at ages 9 or 10 years until age 19 years. Mixed models estimated the association of (1) visit and race with average daily consumption of beverages and (2) beverage intake with BMI and average daily intake of total calories, sucrose, fructose, total sugars, and calcium. RESULTS: For girls of both races, milk consumption decreased and soda consumption increased with time. Changes in beverage intake with time varied by race for all beverages except fruit juice. For all beverage categories, consumption was associated with caloric intake. Of all beverages, increasing soda consumption predicted the greatest increase of BMI and the lowest increase in calcium intake. CONCLUSIONS: Public health efforts are needed to help adolescents gain access to and choose healthful beverages and decrease intake of beverages of minimal nutritional value. SN - 0022-3476 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16492426/Correlates_of_beverage_intake_in_adolescent_girls:_the_National_Heart_Lung_and_Blood_Institute_Growth_and_Health_Study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-3476(05)01092-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -