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Fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to pancreatic cancer risk: a prospective study.

Abstract

High consumption of fruits and vegetables has been associated with a lower risk of pancreatic cancer in many case-control studies. However, cohort studies on this relationship are limited and do not support an association. We examined the associations of overall consumption of fruits and vegetables and consumption of certain subgroups of fruits and vegetables with the incidence of pancreatic cancer among 81,922 women and men in the Swedish Mammography Cohort and the Cohort of Swedish Men. Hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. During an average follow-up of 6.8 years (1998-2004), 135 incident pancreatic cancer cases were diagnosed. After adjustment for age and other risk factors for pancreatic cancer, the HRs for the highest compared with the lowest category of intake were 1.13 (95% CI, 0.66-1.94) for total fruits and vegetables, 1.10 (95% CI, 0.64-1.88) for total fruits, and 1.08 (95% CI, 0.63-1.85) for total vegetables. Among specific subgroups of fruits and vegetables, a nonsignificant inverse association was observed with cruciferous vegetable consumption (> or = 3 servings/wk versus <1 serving/wk: HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.43-1.13). Cabbage consumption was associated with a statistically significant lower risk of pancreatic cancer (> or = 1 serving/wk versus never consumption: HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.39-0.99). Findings from this prospective study do not support a relationship of overall fruit and vegetable consumption with pancreatic cancer risk. The association between consumption of cruciferous vegetables and pancreatic cancer risk warrants further investigation.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se

    , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Brassica
    Diet
    Female
    Fruit
    Humans
    Incidence
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Multivariate Analysis
    Pancreatic Neoplasms
    Proportional Hazards Models
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Assessment
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Sweden
    Vegetables

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16492919

    Citation

    Larsson, Susanna C., et al. "Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in Relation to Pancreatic Cancer Risk: a Prospective Study." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 15, no. 2, 2006, pp. 301-5.
    Larsson SC, Håkansson N, Näslund I, et al. Fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to pancreatic cancer risk: a prospective study. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006;15(2):301-5.
    Larsson, S. C., Håkansson, N., Näslund, I., Bergkvist, L., & Wolk, A. (2006). Fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to pancreatic cancer risk: a prospective study. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 15(2), pp. 301-5.
    Larsson SC, et al. Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in Relation to Pancreatic Cancer Risk: a Prospective Study. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2006;15(2):301-5. PubMed PMID: 16492919.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to pancreatic cancer risk: a prospective study. AU - Larsson,Susanna C, AU - Håkansson,Niclas, AU - Näslund,Ingmar, AU - Bergkvist,Leif, AU - Wolk,Alicja, PY - 2006/2/24/pubmed PY - 2006/6/16/medline PY - 2006/2/24/entrez SP - 301 EP - 5 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 15 IS - 2 N2 - High consumption of fruits and vegetables has been associated with a lower risk of pancreatic cancer in many case-control studies. However, cohort studies on this relationship are limited and do not support an association. We examined the associations of overall consumption of fruits and vegetables and consumption of certain subgroups of fruits and vegetables with the incidence of pancreatic cancer among 81,922 women and men in the Swedish Mammography Cohort and the Cohort of Swedish Men. Hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. During an average follow-up of 6.8 years (1998-2004), 135 incident pancreatic cancer cases were diagnosed. After adjustment for age and other risk factors for pancreatic cancer, the HRs for the highest compared with the lowest category of intake were 1.13 (95% CI, 0.66-1.94) for total fruits and vegetables, 1.10 (95% CI, 0.64-1.88) for total fruits, and 1.08 (95% CI, 0.63-1.85) for total vegetables. Among specific subgroups of fruits and vegetables, a nonsignificant inverse association was observed with cruciferous vegetable consumption (> or = 3 servings/wk versus <1 serving/wk: HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.43-1.13). Cabbage consumption was associated with a statistically significant lower risk of pancreatic cancer (> or = 1 serving/wk versus never consumption: HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.39-0.99). Findings from this prospective study do not support a relationship of overall fruit and vegetable consumption with pancreatic cancer risk. The association between consumption of cruciferous vegetables and pancreatic cancer risk warrants further investigation. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16492919/Fruit_and_vegetable_consumption_in_relation_to_pancreatic_cancer_risk:_a_prospective_study_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=16492919 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -