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Racial differences in correlates of misreporting of energy intake in adolescent females.
Obesity (Silver Spring) 2006; 14(1):156-64O

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the extent of misreporting of energy intake (EI) and its anthropometric, demographic, and psychosocial correlates in a bi-racial cohort of young women.

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES

This was a cross-sectional study of 60 black and 60 white young women, 18 to 21 years old, enrolled in a longitudinal study. Total energy expenditure was assessed using doubly labeled water. Self-reported EI was obtained from 3-day food records. BMI was computed from height and weight. Fat mass was assessed by DXA. Multivariate analyses examined racial differences on the extent of misreporting and its effect on other potential correlates of misreporting. Race-specific step-wise linear regression analysis was performed to examine the effect of BMI, parental education, and drive for thinness on misreporting of EI.

RESULTS

More white women tended to under-report EI than black women (22% vs. 13%, p = 0.07). In black women, under-reporting was significantly (p = 0.01) associated with drive for thinness score but was only marginally (p = 0.1) associated with BMI. Each point increase in drive for thinness score was associated with under-reporting by 40 kcal/d. In white women, under-reporting was significantly (p = 0.03) associated with higher parental education by 440 kcal/d and also only marginally (p = 0.09) with BMI.

DISCUSSION

This tendency for under-reporting of EI limits the use of self-reported EI in studying energy balance in free-living subjects. Most black and almost all white women in their late teens significantly under-reported their EI, whereas under-reporting was not as evident among lean young black women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pennsylvania, USA. skimm@salud.unm.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16493134

Citation

Kimm, Sue Y S., et al. "Racial Differences in Correlates of Misreporting of Energy Intake in Adolescent Females." Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), vol. 14, no. 1, 2006, pp. 156-64.
Kimm SY, Glynn NW, Obarzanek E, et al. Racial differences in correlates of misreporting of energy intake in adolescent females. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006;14(1):156-64.
Kimm, S. Y., Glynn, N. W., Obarzanek, E., Aston, C. E., & Daniels, S. R. (2006). Racial differences in correlates of misreporting of energy intake in adolescent females. Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), 14(1), pp. 156-64.
Kimm SY, et al. Racial Differences in Correlates of Misreporting of Energy Intake in Adolescent Females. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006;14(1):156-64. PubMed PMID: 16493134.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Racial differences in correlates of misreporting of energy intake in adolescent females. AU - Kimm,Sue Y S, AU - Glynn,Nancy W, AU - Obarzanek,Eva, AU - Aston,Christopher E, AU - Daniels,Stephen R, PY - 2006/2/24/pubmed PY - 2006/8/9/medline PY - 2006/2/24/entrez SP - 156 EP - 64 JF - Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) JO - Obesity (Silver Spring) VL - 14 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the extent of misreporting of energy intake (EI) and its anthropometric, demographic, and psychosocial correlates in a bi-racial cohort of young women. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: This was a cross-sectional study of 60 black and 60 white young women, 18 to 21 years old, enrolled in a longitudinal study. Total energy expenditure was assessed using doubly labeled water. Self-reported EI was obtained from 3-day food records. BMI was computed from height and weight. Fat mass was assessed by DXA. Multivariate analyses examined racial differences on the extent of misreporting and its effect on other potential correlates of misreporting. Race-specific step-wise linear regression analysis was performed to examine the effect of BMI, parental education, and drive for thinness on misreporting of EI. RESULTS: More white women tended to under-report EI than black women (22% vs. 13%, p = 0.07). In black women, under-reporting was significantly (p = 0.01) associated with drive for thinness score but was only marginally (p = 0.1) associated with BMI. Each point increase in drive for thinness score was associated with under-reporting by 40 kcal/d. In white women, under-reporting was significantly (p = 0.03) associated with higher parental education by 440 kcal/d and also only marginally (p = 0.09) with BMI. DISCUSSION: This tendency for under-reporting of EI limits the use of self-reported EI in studying energy balance in free-living subjects. Most black and almost all white women in their late teens significantly under-reported their EI, whereas under-reporting was not as evident among lean young black women. SN - 1930-7381 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16493134/Racial_differences_in_correlates_of_misreporting_of_energy_intake_in_adolescent_females_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2006.19 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -