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Efficacy and safety of memantine in moderate-to-severe Alzheimer disease: the evidence to date.
Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2006 Jan-Mar; 20(1):23-9.AD

Abstract

Memantine, a moderate-affinity, uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, is currently the only agent approved for moderately severe to severe Alzheimer disease (AD) in Europe and for moderate-to-severe Alzheimer disease in the United States. In clinical trials, memantine has consistently demonstrated a reduced rate of deterioration on global, cognitive, functional, and behavioral measures, across a range of outcome measures compared with usual care. Notably, improvements versus placebo were seen in individual activities of daily living and behavior, particularly agitation. Efficacy was demonstrated in patients with newly diagnosed Alzheimer disease, patients previously or currently receiving acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, and both institutionalized and community-dwelling Alzheimer disease patients. Memantine has a tolerability profile similar to placebo. This review presents the results of key clinical trials, and includes clinically relevant analyses, such as numbers-needed-to-treat and effect sizes. Increased dependency and institutionalization are significant cost drivers in Alzheimer disease. Memantine is able to reduce dependency, caregiver time required, and mean monthly caregiver and societal costs. Recent studies of the relationship between Alzheimer disease progression, caregiver burden, and healthcare costs emphasize the need for treatments such as memantine that can slow the rate of decline in Alzheimer disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Kingshill Research Centre, Victoria Hospital, Swindon, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16493232

Citation

Bullock, Roger. "Efficacy and Safety of Memantine in Moderate-to-severe Alzheimer Disease: the Evidence to Date." Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders, vol. 20, no. 1, 2006, pp. 23-9.
Bullock R. Efficacy and safety of memantine in moderate-to-severe Alzheimer disease: the evidence to date. Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2006;20(1):23-9.
Bullock, R. (2006). Efficacy and safety of memantine in moderate-to-severe Alzheimer disease: the evidence to date. Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders, 20(1), 23-9.
Bullock R. Efficacy and Safety of Memantine in Moderate-to-severe Alzheimer Disease: the Evidence to Date. Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2006 Jan-Mar;20(1):23-9. PubMed PMID: 16493232.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Efficacy and safety of memantine in moderate-to-severe Alzheimer disease: the evidence to date. A1 - Bullock,Roger, PY - 2006/2/24/pubmed PY - 2006/7/4/medline PY - 2006/2/24/entrez SP - 23 EP - 9 JF - Alzheimer disease and associated disorders JO - Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord VL - 20 IS - 1 N2 - Memantine, a moderate-affinity, uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, is currently the only agent approved for moderately severe to severe Alzheimer disease (AD) in Europe and for moderate-to-severe Alzheimer disease in the United States. In clinical trials, memantine has consistently demonstrated a reduced rate of deterioration on global, cognitive, functional, and behavioral measures, across a range of outcome measures compared with usual care. Notably, improvements versus placebo were seen in individual activities of daily living and behavior, particularly agitation. Efficacy was demonstrated in patients with newly diagnosed Alzheimer disease, patients previously or currently receiving acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, and both institutionalized and community-dwelling Alzheimer disease patients. Memantine has a tolerability profile similar to placebo. This review presents the results of key clinical trials, and includes clinically relevant analyses, such as numbers-needed-to-treat and effect sizes. Increased dependency and institutionalization are significant cost drivers in Alzheimer disease. Memantine is able to reduce dependency, caregiver time required, and mean monthly caregiver and societal costs. Recent studies of the relationship between Alzheimer disease progression, caregiver burden, and healthcare costs emphasize the need for treatments such as memantine that can slow the rate of decline in Alzheimer disease. SN - 0893-0341 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16493232/Efficacy_and_safety_of_memantine_in_moderate_to_severe_Alzheimer_disease:_the_evidence_to_date_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -