Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Reassessing the cost-effectiveness of meningococcal serogroup C conjugate (MCC) vaccines using a transmission dynamic model.
Med Decis Making. 2006 Jan-Feb; 26(1):38-47.MD

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The meningococcal serogroup C conjugate (MCC) vaccination program has successfully reduced morbidity and mortality from serogroup C disease in England and Wales, owing to high short-term vaccine effectiveness and substantial herd immunity. The latter effect was not accounted for in the previous economic analysis of the MCC program.

METHODS

The authors applied a transmission dynamic model, which accounts for herd immunity, to reevaluate the cost-effectiveness of MCC vaccination. The direct and indirect benefits of the MCC vaccine strategy implemented in England and Wales were compared. The cost-effectiveness of alternative MCC vaccine strategies, including future changes to the current schedule, were evaluated.

RESULTS

The authors found that including herd immunity improved the average cost-effectiveness ratio in all cases, although the extent depended on the vaccine strategy considered. Incremental analysis showed that those strategies that offered 1 dose early in the 2nd year of life dominated strategies that offered 3 doses of vaccine in infancy and that catch-up vaccination up to the age of 18 years was also highly attractive. Furthermore, the authors analyzed the effect of future changes to the routine vaccine schedule and predicted that shifting the age at routine vaccination from 2, 3, and 4 months (3 doses) to 12 months (1 dose) resulted in a net gain in the total number of cases prevented with only a few extra cases occurring in children under 1 year of age. This program dominated the current strategy.

CONCLUSIONS

Models that do not include the indirect effects of vaccination will underestimate the impact of MCC vaccination and may lead to distorted decision making.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Modelling and Economics Unit, Centre for Infections, Health Protection Agency, 61 Colindale Avenue, London, NW95EQ, UK.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16495199

Citation

Trotter, Caroline L., and W John Edmunds. "Reassessing the Cost-effectiveness of Meningococcal Serogroup C Conjugate (MCC) Vaccines Using a Transmission Dynamic Model." Medical Decision Making : an International Journal of the Society for Medical Decision Making, vol. 26, no. 1, 2006, pp. 38-47.
Trotter CL, Edmunds WJ. Reassessing the cost-effectiveness of meningococcal serogroup C conjugate (MCC) vaccines using a transmission dynamic model. Med Decis Making. 2006;26(1):38-47.
Trotter, C. L., & Edmunds, W. J. (2006). Reassessing the cost-effectiveness of meningococcal serogroup C conjugate (MCC) vaccines using a transmission dynamic model. Medical Decision Making : an International Journal of the Society for Medical Decision Making, 26(1), 38-47.
Trotter CL, Edmunds WJ. Reassessing the Cost-effectiveness of Meningococcal Serogroup C Conjugate (MCC) Vaccines Using a Transmission Dynamic Model. Med Decis Making. 2006 Jan-Feb;26(1):38-47. PubMed PMID: 16495199.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Reassessing the cost-effectiveness of meningococcal serogroup C conjugate (MCC) vaccines using a transmission dynamic model. AU - Trotter,Caroline L, AU - Edmunds,W John, PY - 2006/2/24/pubmed PY - 2006/6/21/medline PY - 2006/2/24/entrez SP - 38 EP - 47 JF - Medical decision making : an international journal of the Society for Medical Decision Making JO - Med Decis Making VL - 26 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: The meningococcal serogroup C conjugate (MCC) vaccination program has successfully reduced morbidity and mortality from serogroup C disease in England and Wales, owing to high short-term vaccine effectiveness and substantial herd immunity. The latter effect was not accounted for in the previous economic analysis of the MCC program. METHODS: The authors applied a transmission dynamic model, which accounts for herd immunity, to reevaluate the cost-effectiveness of MCC vaccination. The direct and indirect benefits of the MCC vaccine strategy implemented in England and Wales were compared. The cost-effectiveness of alternative MCC vaccine strategies, including future changes to the current schedule, were evaluated. RESULTS: The authors found that including herd immunity improved the average cost-effectiveness ratio in all cases, although the extent depended on the vaccine strategy considered. Incremental analysis showed that those strategies that offered 1 dose early in the 2nd year of life dominated strategies that offered 3 doses of vaccine in infancy and that catch-up vaccination up to the age of 18 years was also highly attractive. Furthermore, the authors analyzed the effect of future changes to the routine vaccine schedule and predicted that shifting the age at routine vaccination from 2, 3, and 4 months (3 doses) to 12 months (1 dose) resulted in a net gain in the total number of cases prevented with only a few extra cases occurring in children under 1 year of age. This program dominated the current strategy. CONCLUSIONS: Models that do not include the indirect effects of vaccination will underestimate the impact of MCC vaccination and may lead to distorted decision making. SN - 0272-989X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16495199/Reassessing_the_cost_effectiveness_of_meningococcal_serogroup_C_conjugate__MCC__vaccines_using_a_transmission_dynamic_model_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0272989X05284109?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -