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Formation of biogenic amines throughout the industrial manufacture of red wine.
J Food Prot. 2006 Feb; 69(2):397-404.JF

Abstract

Changes in biogenic amines (histamine, methylamine, ethylamine, tyramine, phenylethylamine, putrescine, and cadaverine) were monitored during the industrial manufacture of 55 batches of red wine. The origin of these amines in relation to must, alcoholic fermentation, malolactic fermentation, sulfur dioxide addition, and wine aging and the interactions between amines and their corresponding amino acids and pH were statistically evaluated in samples from the same batches throughout the elaboration process. Some amines can be produced in the grape or the musts (e.g., putrescine, cadaverine, and phenylethylamine) or can be formed by yeast during alcoholic fermentation (e.g., ethylamine and phenylethylamine), although quantitatively only very low concentrations are reached in these stages (less than 3 mg/liter). Malolactic fermentation was the main mechanism of biogenic amine formation, especially of histamine, tyramine, and putrescine. During this stage, the increase in these amines was accompanied by a significant decline in their amino acid precursors. Significant correlations between biogenic amine formation and the disappearance of their corresponding amino acids were observed, which clearly supports the hypothesis that malolactic bacteria are responsible for accumulation of these amines in wines. No increase in the concentration of biogenic amines was observed after SO2 addition and during wine aging, indicating that sulfur dioxide prevents amine formation in subsequent stages.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Instituto de Fermentaciones Industriales, CSIC, Madrid, Spain.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16496582

Citation

Marcobal, A, et al. "Formation of Biogenic Amines Throughout the Industrial Manufacture of Red Wine." Journal of Food Protection, vol. 69, no. 2, 2006, pp. 397-404.
Marcobal A, Martín-Alvarez PJ, Polo MC, et al. Formation of biogenic amines throughout the industrial manufacture of red wine. J Food Prot. 2006;69(2):397-404.
Marcobal, A., Martín-Alvarez, P. J., Polo, M. C., Muñoz, R., & Moreno-Arribas, M. V. (2006). Formation of biogenic amines throughout the industrial manufacture of red wine. Journal of Food Protection, 69(2), 397-404.
Marcobal A, et al. Formation of Biogenic Amines Throughout the Industrial Manufacture of Red Wine. J Food Prot. 2006;69(2):397-404. PubMed PMID: 16496582.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Formation of biogenic amines throughout the industrial manufacture of red wine. AU - Marcobal,A, AU - Martín-Alvarez,P J, AU - Polo,M C, AU - Muñoz,R, AU - Moreno-Arribas,M V, PY - 2006/2/25/pubmed PY - 2006/3/11/medline PY - 2006/2/25/entrez SP - 397 EP - 404 JF - Journal of food protection JO - J. Food Prot. VL - 69 IS - 2 N2 - Changes in biogenic amines (histamine, methylamine, ethylamine, tyramine, phenylethylamine, putrescine, and cadaverine) were monitored during the industrial manufacture of 55 batches of red wine. The origin of these amines in relation to must, alcoholic fermentation, malolactic fermentation, sulfur dioxide addition, and wine aging and the interactions between amines and their corresponding amino acids and pH were statistically evaluated in samples from the same batches throughout the elaboration process. Some amines can be produced in the grape or the musts (e.g., putrescine, cadaverine, and phenylethylamine) or can be formed by yeast during alcoholic fermentation (e.g., ethylamine and phenylethylamine), although quantitatively only very low concentrations are reached in these stages (less than 3 mg/liter). Malolactic fermentation was the main mechanism of biogenic amine formation, especially of histamine, tyramine, and putrescine. During this stage, the increase in these amines was accompanied by a significant decline in their amino acid precursors. Significant correlations between biogenic amine formation and the disappearance of their corresponding amino acids were observed, which clearly supports the hypothesis that malolactic bacteria are responsible for accumulation of these amines in wines. No increase in the concentration of biogenic amines was observed after SO2 addition and during wine aging, indicating that sulfur dioxide prevents amine formation in subsequent stages. SN - 0362-028X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16496582/Formation_of_biogenic_amines_throughout_the_industrial_manufacture_of_red_wine_ L2 - https://meridian.allenpress.com/jfp/article-lookup/doi/10.4315/0362-028x-69.2.397 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -