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Panic and suicidal ideation and suicide attempts: results from the National Comorbidity Survey.
Depress Anxiety. 2006; 23(3):124-32.DA

Abstract

Our objective was to determine the association between panic attacks (PAs) and panic disorder (PD), and suicidal ideation (SI) and suicide attempts (SAs) in a nationally representative sample of adults in the community. Data were drawn from the National Comorbidity Survey (n=5,877), a representative household sample of adults ages 15-54 in the United States. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to examine the relationship between current and lifetime PA and PD and SI and SA, adjusting for differences in demographic characteristics, comorbid mental disorders (major depression, alcohol dependence, and substance dependence), childhood trauma (physical and sexual abuse), and number of lifetime mental disorders. Past-year and lifetime PA and PD were associated with increased SI (both past year and lifetime), and persisted after adjusting for comorbidity and early trauma. Associations between PA and SA were no longer statistically significant after adjusting for comorbidity. Past-year and lifetime PD were associated with lifetime SA, but these associations were no longer statistically significant after adjusting for comorbidity. Past-year and lifetime PD were associated with past-year SA, and this association persisted after adjusting for demographics, comorbidity, and number of lifetime mental disorders. These findings are consistent with previous results, and further help to clarify the relationships between panic and suicide behavior by identifying potential methodological reasons for inconsistencies in results from previous studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA. rdg66@columbia.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16502406

Citation

Goodwin, Renee D., and Peter Roy-Byrne. "Panic and Suicidal Ideation and Suicide Attempts: Results From the National Comorbidity Survey." Depression and Anxiety, vol. 23, no. 3, 2006, pp. 124-32.
Goodwin RD, Roy-Byrne P. Panic and suicidal ideation and suicide attempts: results from the National Comorbidity Survey. Depress Anxiety. 2006;23(3):124-32.
Goodwin, R. D., & Roy-Byrne, P. (2006). Panic and suicidal ideation and suicide attempts: results from the National Comorbidity Survey. Depression and Anxiety, 23(3), 124-32.
Goodwin RD, Roy-Byrne P. Panic and Suicidal Ideation and Suicide Attempts: Results From the National Comorbidity Survey. Depress Anxiety. 2006;23(3):124-32. PubMed PMID: 16502406.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Panic and suicidal ideation and suicide attempts: results from the National Comorbidity Survey. AU - Goodwin,Renee D, AU - Roy-Byrne,Peter, PY - 2006/2/28/pubmed PY - 2006/11/11/medline PY - 2006/2/28/entrez SP - 124 EP - 32 JF - Depression and anxiety JO - Depress Anxiety VL - 23 IS - 3 N2 - Our objective was to determine the association between panic attacks (PAs) and panic disorder (PD), and suicidal ideation (SI) and suicide attempts (SAs) in a nationally representative sample of adults in the community. Data were drawn from the National Comorbidity Survey (n=5,877), a representative household sample of adults ages 15-54 in the United States. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to examine the relationship between current and lifetime PA and PD and SI and SA, adjusting for differences in demographic characteristics, comorbid mental disorders (major depression, alcohol dependence, and substance dependence), childhood trauma (physical and sexual abuse), and number of lifetime mental disorders. Past-year and lifetime PA and PD were associated with increased SI (both past year and lifetime), and persisted after adjusting for comorbidity and early trauma. Associations between PA and SA were no longer statistically significant after adjusting for comorbidity. Past-year and lifetime PD were associated with lifetime SA, but these associations were no longer statistically significant after adjusting for comorbidity. Past-year and lifetime PD were associated with past-year SA, and this association persisted after adjusting for demographics, comorbidity, and number of lifetime mental disorders. These findings are consistent with previous results, and further help to clarify the relationships between panic and suicide behavior by identifying potential methodological reasons for inconsistencies in results from previous studies. SN - 1091-4269 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16502406/Panic_and_suicidal_ideation_and_suicide_attempts:_results_from_the_National_Comorbidity_Survey_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/da.20151 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -