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Potential for misclassification of micronutrient status in children participating in a Head Start program.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2006 Mar; 106(3):376-82.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate relations among measures of iron and zinc status, C-reactive protein (CRP), and leukocytes in low-income children participating in the Head Start program.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional correlational study with samples collected at Head Start centers in May 2003.

SUBJECTS/SETTING

Forty-seven children (aged 3 to 5 years) attending Head Start centers in three rural communities.

MEASURES

Zinc, ferritin, CRP, and complete blood count were analyzed in nonfasting blood samples.

STATISTICAL ANALYSES

Correlations were computed among leukocyte levels, CRP levels, and measures of micronutrient status. Children having two abnormal measures (ie, leukocytes and CRP) were compared by univariate analysis of variance with children having zero or one abnormal measure.

RESULTS

Most (72%) of the children had elevated CRP levels. Four percent were anemic (hemoglobin<11.0 g/dL [<110 g/L]); 11% had low iron stores (serum ferritin<or=15 ng/mL [<or=33.7 pmol/L]); and 77% had low iron stores when a reference value that accounts for the presence of infection was used (serum ferritin<or=30 ng/mL [<or=67.4 pmol/L]). Twenty-one percent had low plasma zinc levels. Children with two measures that indicated infection had higher serum ferritin and lower plasma zinc levels than children with zero or one indicator of infection.

CONCLUSIONS

The link between measures of infection and serum ferritin levels suggests low-income preschool children with low iron stores are not identified by the <or=15 ng/mL (<or=33.7 pmol/L) criterion. The link between zinc and infection suggests possible overestimations of zinc deficiency in low-income children. Thus, in this population, the presence of infection (as indicated by CRP levels and leukocyte counts) should be determined to assess micronutrient status.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Food Science, and Hospitality, South Dakota State University, Brookings 57007, USA. elizabeth.droke@sdstate.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16503227

Citation

Droke, Elizabeth A., et al. "Potential for Misclassification of Micronutrient Status in Children Participating in a Head Start Program." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 106, no. 3, 2006, pp. 376-82.
Droke EA, Kennedy TS, Hubbs-Tait L. Potential for misclassification of micronutrient status in children participating in a Head Start program. J Am Diet Assoc. 2006;106(3):376-82.
Droke, E. A., Kennedy, T. S., & Hubbs-Tait, L. (2006). Potential for misclassification of micronutrient status in children participating in a Head Start program. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 106(3), 376-82.
Droke EA, Kennedy TS, Hubbs-Tait L. Potential for Misclassification of Micronutrient Status in Children Participating in a Head Start Program. J Am Diet Assoc. 2006;106(3):376-82. PubMed PMID: 16503227.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Potential for misclassification of micronutrient status in children participating in a Head Start program. AU - Droke,Elizabeth A, AU - Kennedy,Tay Seacord, AU - Hubbs-Tait,Laura, PY - 2004/11/15/received PY - 2006/3/1/pubmed PY - 2006/4/13/medline PY - 2006/3/1/entrez SP - 376 EP - 82 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 106 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate relations among measures of iron and zinc status, C-reactive protein (CRP), and leukocytes in low-income children participating in the Head Start program. DESIGN: Cross-sectional correlational study with samples collected at Head Start centers in May 2003. SUBJECTS/SETTING: Forty-seven children (aged 3 to 5 years) attending Head Start centers in three rural communities. MEASURES: Zinc, ferritin, CRP, and complete blood count were analyzed in nonfasting blood samples. STATISTICAL ANALYSES: Correlations were computed among leukocyte levels, CRP levels, and measures of micronutrient status. Children having two abnormal measures (ie, leukocytes and CRP) were compared by univariate analysis of variance with children having zero or one abnormal measure. RESULTS: Most (72%) of the children had elevated CRP levels. Four percent were anemic (hemoglobin<11.0 g/dL [<110 g/L]); 11% had low iron stores (serum ferritin<or=15 ng/mL [<or=33.7 pmol/L]); and 77% had low iron stores when a reference value that accounts for the presence of infection was used (serum ferritin<or=30 ng/mL [<or=67.4 pmol/L]). Twenty-one percent had low plasma zinc levels. Children with two measures that indicated infection had higher serum ferritin and lower plasma zinc levels than children with zero or one indicator of infection. CONCLUSIONS: The link between measures of infection and serum ferritin levels suggests low-income preschool children with low iron stores are not identified by the <or=15 ng/mL (<or=33.7 pmol/L) criterion. The link between zinc and infection suggests possible overestimations of zinc deficiency in low-income children. Thus, in this population, the presence of infection (as indicated by CRP levels and leukocyte counts) should be determined to assess micronutrient status. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16503227/Potential_for_misclassification_of_micronutrient_status_in_children_participating_in_a_Head_Start_program_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(05)02082-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -