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Vitamin D and autoimmune disease--implications for practice from the multiple sclerosis literature.

Abstract

Recent studies and commentaries link vitamin D with several autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS). Adequate vitamin D intake reduces inflammatory cytokines through control of gene expression, thus inadequate vitamin D intake is suggested as a mechanism that could contribute to inflammation and, consequently, development of MS. Poor vitamin D status has been associated with increased risk for development of MS, and patients with MS may suffer consequences of vitamin D deficiency, such as bone loss. Animal studies and very limited human data suggest possible benefit from vitamin D supplementation in patients with MS. Based on the current state of research, a key principle for practicing dietetics professionals is to include vitamin D status in nutritional assessment. For those at risk for poor vitamin D status, intake can be enhanced by food-based advice and, when indicated, vitamin D supplementation.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas 75390-8877, USA. barbara.mark@utsouthwestern.edu

    Source

    MeSH

    Animals
    Autoimmune Diseases
    Diet
    Dietary Supplements
    Disease Models, Animal
    Humans
    Mice
    Multiple Sclerosis
    Nutritional Requirements
    Nutritional Status
    Risk Factors
    Vitamin D
    Vitamin D Deficiency

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16503232

    Citation

    Mark, Barbara L., and Jo Ann S. Carson. "Vitamin D and Autoimmune Disease--implications for Practice From the Multiple Sclerosis Literature." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 106, no. 3, 2006, pp. 418-24.
    Mark BL, Carson JA. Vitamin D and autoimmune disease--implications for practice from the multiple sclerosis literature. J Am Diet Assoc. 2006;106(3):418-24.
    Mark, B. L., & Carson, J. A. (2006). Vitamin D and autoimmune disease--implications for practice from the multiple sclerosis literature. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 106(3), pp. 418-24.
    Mark BL, Carson JA. Vitamin D and Autoimmune Disease--implications for Practice From the Multiple Sclerosis Literature. J Am Diet Assoc. 2006;106(3):418-24. PubMed PMID: 16503232.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin D and autoimmune disease--implications for practice from the multiple sclerosis literature. AU - Mark,Barbara L, AU - Carson,Jo Ann S, PY - 2004/11/04/received PY - 2006/3/1/pubmed PY - 2006/4/13/medline PY - 2006/3/1/entrez SP - 418 EP - 24 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 106 IS - 3 N2 - Recent studies and commentaries link vitamin D with several autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS). Adequate vitamin D intake reduces inflammatory cytokines through control of gene expression, thus inadequate vitamin D intake is suggested as a mechanism that could contribute to inflammation and, consequently, development of MS. Poor vitamin D status has been associated with increased risk for development of MS, and patients with MS may suffer consequences of vitamin D deficiency, such as bone loss. Animal studies and very limited human data suggest possible benefit from vitamin D supplementation in patients with MS. Based on the current state of research, a key principle for practicing dietetics professionals is to include vitamin D status in nutritional assessment. For those at risk for poor vitamin D status, intake can be enhanced by food-based advice and, when indicated, vitamin D supplementation. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16503232/Vitamin_D_and_autoimmune_disease__implications_for_practice_from_the_multiple_sclerosis_literature_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(05)02084-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -