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Accommodative ciliary body and lens function in rhesus monkeys, I: normal lens, zonule and ciliary process configuration in the iridectomized eye.
Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2006 Mar; 47(3):1076-86.IO

Abstract

PURPOSE

The underlying causes of presbyopia, and the functional relationship between the ciliary muscle and lens during aging are unclear. In the current study, these relationships were studied in rhesus monkeys, whose accommodative apparatus and age-related loss of accommodation are similar to those in humans.

METHODS

Centripetal ciliary body and lens equator movements were measured during accommodation in 28 eyes of 21 rhesus monkeys (ages, 5.7-26 years) by goniovideography. Ultrasound biomicroscopy was performed in 21 eyes of 17 monkeys. Narrowing of the angle between the anterior aspect of the ciliary body and the inner aspect of the cornea was used as a surrogate indicator of forward ciliary body movement during accommodation.

RESULTS

Average centripetal ciliary body movement in older eyes (age > or =17 years, n = 16) was approximately 20% (0.09 mm) less than in young eyes (age, 6-10 years, n = 6), but not enough to explain the 60% (0.21 mm) loss in centripetal lens movement nor the 76% (10.2 D) loss in accommodative amplitude. Average forward ciliary body movement was 67% (49 degrees) less in older (n = 11) versus young (n = 6) eyes. Maximum accommodative amplitude correlated significantly with the amplitude of centripetal lens movement (0.02 +/- 0.003 mm/D; n = 28; P < 0.001) and with forward ciliary body movement (3.34 +/- 0.54 deg/D; n = 21; P = 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

Decreased lens movement with age could be in part secondary to extralenticular age-related changes, such as loss of ciliary body forward movement. Ciliary body centripetal movement may not be the limiting component in accommodation in the older eye.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Wisconsin Regional Primate Research Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison 53792-3284, USA. macroft@wisc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16505044

Citation

Croft, Mary Ann, et al. "Accommodative Ciliary Body and Lens Function in Rhesus Monkeys, I: Normal Lens, Zonule and Ciliary Process Configuration in the Iridectomized Eye." Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, vol. 47, no. 3, 2006, pp. 1076-86.
Croft MA, Glasser A, Heatley G, et al. Accommodative ciliary body and lens function in rhesus monkeys, I: normal lens, zonule and ciliary process configuration in the iridectomized eye. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2006;47(3):1076-86.
Croft, M. A., Glasser, A., Heatley, G., McDonald, J., Ebbert, T., Dahl, D. B., Nadkarni, N. V., & Kaufman, P. L. (2006). Accommodative ciliary body and lens function in rhesus monkeys, I: normal lens, zonule and ciliary process configuration in the iridectomized eye. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 47(3), 1076-86.
Croft MA, et al. Accommodative Ciliary Body and Lens Function in Rhesus Monkeys, I: Normal Lens, Zonule and Ciliary Process Configuration in the Iridectomized Eye. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2006;47(3):1076-86. PubMed PMID: 16505044.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Accommodative ciliary body and lens function in rhesus monkeys, I: normal lens, zonule and ciliary process configuration in the iridectomized eye. AU - Croft,Mary Ann, AU - Glasser,Adrian, AU - Heatley,Gregg, AU - McDonald,Jared, AU - Ebbert,Timothy, AU - Dahl,David B, AU - Nadkarni,Nivedita V, AU - Kaufman,Paul L, PY - 2006/3/1/pubmed PY - 2006/4/4/medline PY - 2006/3/1/entrez SP - 1076 EP - 86 JF - Investigative ophthalmology & visual science JO - Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. VL - 47 IS - 3 N2 - PURPOSE: The underlying causes of presbyopia, and the functional relationship between the ciliary muscle and lens during aging are unclear. In the current study, these relationships were studied in rhesus monkeys, whose accommodative apparatus and age-related loss of accommodation are similar to those in humans. METHODS: Centripetal ciliary body and lens equator movements were measured during accommodation in 28 eyes of 21 rhesus monkeys (ages, 5.7-26 years) by goniovideography. Ultrasound biomicroscopy was performed in 21 eyes of 17 monkeys. Narrowing of the angle between the anterior aspect of the ciliary body and the inner aspect of the cornea was used as a surrogate indicator of forward ciliary body movement during accommodation. RESULTS: Average centripetal ciliary body movement in older eyes (age > or =17 years, n = 16) was approximately 20% (0.09 mm) less than in young eyes (age, 6-10 years, n = 6), but not enough to explain the 60% (0.21 mm) loss in centripetal lens movement nor the 76% (10.2 D) loss in accommodative amplitude. Average forward ciliary body movement was 67% (49 degrees) less in older (n = 11) versus young (n = 6) eyes. Maximum accommodative amplitude correlated significantly with the amplitude of centripetal lens movement (0.02 +/- 0.003 mm/D; n = 28; P < 0.001) and with forward ciliary body movement (3.34 +/- 0.54 deg/D; n = 21; P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Decreased lens movement with age could be in part secondary to extralenticular age-related changes, such as loss of ciliary body forward movement. Ciliary body centripetal movement may not be the limiting component in accommodation in the older eye. SN - 0146-0404 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16505044/Accommodative_ciliary_body_and_lens_function_in_rhesus_monkeys_I:_normal_lens_zonule_and_ciliary_process_configuration_in_the_iridectomized_eye_ L2 - https://iovs.arvojournals.org/article.aspx?doi=10.1167/iovs.04-1523 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -