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Effects of frozen and refrigerated storage on organic acid profiles of goat milk plain soft and Monterey Jack cheeses.
J Dairy Sci. 2006 Mar; 89(3):862-71.JD

Abstract

The effects of 6 mo of freezing and refrigeration on organic acid profiles of 2 types of goat milk cheese [plain soft (PS) and Monterey Jack (MJ)] were studied in comparison with those of a nonfrozen control (NFC). Three lots of commercial PS cheeses were purchased, and 3 lots of MJ cheeses were manufactured at the University dairy plant. Each lot of the 2 types of cheeses was subdivided into 4 equal portions, and one subsample of each cheese was immediately stored at 4 degrees C as the NFC for 0, 14, and 28 d. The other 3 were immediately frozen (-20 degrees C) for 0, 3, and 6 mo (0MF, 3MF, and 6MF) and subsequently thawed the next day at 4 degrees C. The samples were then stored at 4 degrees C for 0, 14, and 28 d. Organic acids were quantified using an HPLC. The PS had no pyruvic acid, and MJ contained no isotartaric acid; however, several unknown large peaks appeared between propionic and butyric acids. Differences in organic acid contents between PS and MJ cheeses were significant for all acids except citric and lactic acid. Lot effect was significant for most of the known acids, indicating that variations existed in milk composition and manufacturing parameters. Effects of storage treatments (NFC, 0MF, 3MF, and 6MF) were significant for most organic acids, except for orotic and a few unidentified acids. Aging at 4 degrees C for 4 wk had little influence on all organic acids, except butyric acid. Concentrations of butyric, lactic, propionic, tartaric, and uric acids were significantly elevated as the frozen storage period advanced. At the initial stage, there were no differences in pH and acid degree values between NFC and frozen-stored groups of both cheeses. However, acid degree values gradually increased as the refrigerated storage extended up to 4 wk, indicating that lipolysis increased as the refrigeration storage at 4 degrees C advanced. Although levels of several organic acids were changed in the goat cheeses, the prolonged frozen storage, up to 6 mo, was apparently feasible for extending storage.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Georgia Small Ruminant Research and Extension Center, Fort Valley State University, Fort Valley, 31030-4313, USA. parky@fvsu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16507679

Citation

Park, Y W., et al. "Effects of Frozen and Refrigerated Storage On Organic Acid Profiles of Goat Milk Plain Soft and Monterey Jack Cheeses." Journal of Dairy Science, vol. 89, no. 3, 2006, pp. 862-71.
Park YW, Lee JH, Lee SJ. Effects of frozen and refrigerated storage on organic acid profiles of goat milk plain soft and Monterey Jack cheeses. J Dairy Sci. 2006;89(3):862-71.
Park, Y. W., Lee, J. H., & Lee, S. J. (2006). Effects of frozen and refrigerated storage on organic acid profiles of goat milk plain soft and Monterey Jack cheeses. Journal of Dairy Science, 89(3), 862-71.
Park YW, Lee JH, Lee SJ. Effects of Frozen and Refrigerated Storage On Organic Acid Profiles of Goat Milk Plain Soft and Monterey Jack Cheeses. J Dairy Sci. 2006;89(3):862-71. PubMed PMID: 16507679.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of frozen and refrigerated storage on organic acid profiles of goat milk plain soft and Monterey Jack cheeses. AU - Park,Y W, AU - Lee,J H, AU - Lee,S J, PY - 2006/3/2/pubmed PY - 2006/6/13/medline PY - 2006/3/2/entrez SP - 862 EP - 71 JF - Journal of dairy science JO - J Dairy Sci VL - 89 IS - 3 N2 - The effects of 6 mo of freezing and refrigeration on organic acid profiles of 2 types of goat milk cheese [plain soft (PS) and Monterey Jack (MJ)] were studied in comparison with those of a nonfrozen control (NFC). Three lots of commercial PS cheeses were purchased, and 3 lots of MJ cheeses were manufactured at the University dairy plant. Each lot of the 2 types of cheeses was subdivided into 4 equal portions, and one subsample of each cheese was immediately stored at 4 degrees C as the NFC for 0, 14, and 28 d. The other 3 were immediately frozen (-20 degrees C) for 0, 3, and 6 mo (0MF, 3MF, and 6MF) and subsequently thawed the next day at 4 degrees C. The samples were then stored at 4 degrees C for 0, 14, and 28 d. Organic acids were quantified using an HPLC. The PS had no pyruvic acid, and MJ contained no isotartaric acid; however, several unknown large peaks appeared between propionic and butyric acids. Differences in organic acid contents between PS and MJ cheeses were significant for all acids except citric and lactic acid. Lot effect was significant for most of the known acids, indicating that variations existed in milk composition and manufacturing parameters. Effects of storage treatments (NFC, 0MF, 3MF, and 6MF) were significant for most organic acids, except for orotic and a few unidentified acids. Aging at 4 degrees C for 4 wk had little influence on all organic acids, except butyric acid. Concentrations of butyric, lactic, propionic, tartaric, and uric acids were significantly elevated as the frozen storage period advanced. At the initial stage, there were no differences in pH and acid degree values between NFC and frozen-stored groups of both cheeses. However, acid degree values gradually increased as the refrigerated storage extended up to 4 wk, indicating that lipolysis increased as the refrigeration storage at 4 degrees C advanced. Although levels of several organic acids were changed in the goat cheeses, the prolonged frozen storage, up to 6 mo, was apparently feasible for extending storage. SN - 1525-3198 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16507679/Effects_of_frozen_and_refrigerated_storage_on_organic_acid_profiles_of_goat_milk_plain_soft_and_Monterey_Jack_cheeses_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -