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Gender-related differences in visceral perception in health and irritable bowel syndrome.
J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2006 Feb; 21(2):468-73.JG

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is more common in female subjects, and IBS patients generally exhibit reduced pain thresholds to rectal distension. The aim of the present paper was to determine gender-related differences in rectal perception in both healthy controls and IBS patients.

METHODS

Fifty-nine IBS patients (age 20-65 years; mean, 39.2 years; 31 women, 28 men) with symptoms that fulfilled Rome-II criteria and 21 healthy controls (age 25-58 years; mean, 37.8 years; 11 women, 10 men) were recruited. Participants completed a questionnaire regarding bowel symptoms and psychological distress, and maximal tolerable pressures were evaluated via barostat tests.

RESULTS

Although healthy women appear to have lower perception thresholds than men, significant gender differences in pain sensitivity were not detected (P > 0.05). In addition, female patients with IBS also exhibited no enhanced colorectal perception, as compared with male IBS patients (P > 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

No gender differences in visceral perception were determined to exist between the healthy controls and the IBS patients. Therefore, the increased prevalence of IBS in women may be related to another set of pathophysiological factors, and not to gender-related differences in visceroperception.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16509877

Citation

Kim, Hyun Seo, et al. "Gender-related Differences in Visceral Perception in Health and Irritable Bowel Syndrome." Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, vol. 21, no. 2, 2006, pp. 468-73.
Kim HS, Rhee PL, Park J, et al. Gender-related differences in visceral perception in health and irritable bowel syndrome. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2006;21(2):468-73.
Kim, H. S., Rhee, P. L., Park, J., Lee, J. H., Kim, Y. H., Kim, J. J., & Rhee, J. C. (2006). Gender-related differences in visceral perception in health and irritable bowel syndrome. Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 21(2), 468-73.
Kim HS, et al. Gender-related Differences in Visceral Perception in Health and Irritable Bowel Syndrome. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2006;21(2):468-73. PubMed PMID: 16509877.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gender-related differences in visceral perception in health and irritable bowel syndrome. AU - Kim,Hyun Seo, AU - Rhee,Poong-Lyul, AU - Park,Jungho, AU - Lee,Jun Haeng, AU - Kim,Young-Ho, AU - Kim,Jae Jun, AU - Rhee,Jong Chul, PY - 2006/3/3/pubmed PY - 2006/8/2/medline PY - 2006/3/3/entrez SP - 468 EP - 73 JF - Journal of gastroenterology and hepatology JO - J Gastroenterol Hepatol VL - 21 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is more common in female subjects, and IBS patients generally exhibit reduced pain thresholds to rectal distension. The aim of the present paper was to determine gender-related differences in rectal perception in both healthy controls and IBS patients. METHODS: Fifty-nine IBS patients (age 20-65 years; mean, 39.2 years; 31 women, 28 men) with symptoms that fulfilled Rome-II criteria and 21 healthy controls (age 25-58 years; mean, 37.8 years; 11 women, 10 men) were recruited. Participants completed a questionnaire regarding bowel symptoms and psychological distress, and maximal tolerable pressures were evaluated via barostat tests. RESULTS: Although healthy women appear to have lower perception thresholds than men, significant gender differences in pain sensitivity were not detected (P > 0.05). In addition, female patients with IBS also exhibited no enhanced colorectal perception, as compared with male IBS patients (P > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: No gender differences in visceral perception were determined to exist between the healthy controls and the IBS patients. Therefore, the increased prevalence of IBS in women may be related to another set of pathophysiological factors, and not to gender-related differences in visceroperception. SN - 0815-9319 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16509877/Gender_related_differences_in_visceral_perception_in_health_and_irritable_bowel_syndrome_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1440-1746.2005.04060.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -