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Dissociation of perception and action unmasked by the hollow-face illusion.
Brain Res. 2006 Mar 29; 1080(1):9-16.BR

Abstract

It has been suggested that there are two separate visual streams in the human cerebral cortex: a ventral pathway that provides perceptual representations of the world and serves as a platform for cognitive operations, and a dorsal pathway that transforms visual information for the control of motor acts. Evidence for this distinction comes from neuropsychology, neuroimaging, and neurophysiology. There is also evidence from experimental psychology, with normal observers experiencing an illusion-where perception and action can be dissociated, although much of this evidence is controversial. Here, we report an experiment aimed at demonstrating a large dissociation between perception and fast action using the hollow-face illusion, in which a hollow mask looks like a normal convex face. Participants estimated the positions of small targets placed on the actually hollow but apparently normal face and used their fingers to 'flick' the targets off. Despite the presence of a compelling illusion of a normal face, the flicking movements were directed at the real, not the illusory locations of the targets. These results show that the same visual stimulus can have completely opposite effects on conscious perception and visual control of fast action.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Neuroscience Program, University of Western Ontario, London ON, N6A 5C2, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16516866

Citation

Króliczak, Grzegorz, et al. "Dissociation of Perception and Action Unmasked By the Hollow-face Illusion." Brain Research, vol. 1080, no. 1, 2006, pp. 9-16.
Króliczak G, Heard P, Goodale MA, et al. Dissociation of perception and action unmasked by the hollow-face illusion. Brain Res. 2006;1080(1):9-16.
Króliczak, G., Heard, P., Goodale, M. A., & Gregory, R. L. (2006). Dissociation of perception and action unmasked by the hollow-face illusion. Brain Research, 1080(1), 9-16.
Króliczak G, et al. Dissociation of Perception and Action Unmasked By the Hollow-face Illusion. Brain Res. 2006 Mar 29;1080(1):9-16. PubMed PMID: 16516866.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dissociation of perception and action unmasked by the hollow-face illusion. AU - Króliczak,Grzegorz, AU - Heard,Priscilla, AU - Goodale,Melvyn A, AU - Gregory,Richard L, Y1 - 2006/03/06/ PY - 2004/08/31/received PY - 2004/11/24/revised PY - 2005/01/10/accepted PY - 2006/3/7/pubmed PY - 2006/6/16/medline PY - 2006/3/7/entrez SP - 9 EP - 16 JF - Brain research JO - Brain Res. VL - 1080 IS - 1 N2 - It has been suggested that there are two separate visual streams in the human cerebral cortex: a ventral pathway that provides perceptual representations of the world and serves as a platform for cognitive operations, and a dorsal pathway that transforms visual information for the control of motor acts. Evidence for this distinction comes from neuropsychology, neuroimaging, and neurophysiology. There is also evidence from experimental psychology, with normal observers experiencing an illusion-where perception and action can be dissociated, although much of this evidence is controversial. Here, we report an experiment aimed at demonstrating a large dissociation between perception and fast action using the hollow-face illusion, in which a hollow mask looks like a normal convex face. Participants estimated the positions of small targets placed on the actually hollow but apparently normal face and used their fingers to 'flick' the targets off. Despite the presence of a compelling illusion of a normal face, the flicking movements were directed at the real, not the illusory locations of the targets. These results show that the same visual stimulus can have completely opposite effects on conscious perception and visual control of fast action. SN - 0006-8993 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16516866/Dissociation_of_perception_and_action_unmasked_by_the_hollow_face_illusion_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0006-8993(06)00200-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -