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Lymphovascular invasion in prostate cancer: prognostic significance in patients treated with radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy.
Cancer. 2006 Apr 01; 106(7):1521-6.C

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Lymphovascular invasion (LVI) is found in approximately 5% to 53% of specimens after radical prostatectomy (RP). Although LVI is associated with higher rates of recurrence after RP, its prognostic significance after postprostatectomy radiotherapy (P-XRT) is unclear.

METHODS

The medical records of men who received P-XRT from 1991 to 2001 at 2 institutions were reviewed for the presence of LVI in RP specimens. Multiple patient variables were evaluated for their association with LVI using Fisher exact tests and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. The time to biochemical recurrence (BCR) and the time to distant metastases (DM) after RP were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier estimations, log-rank tests, and Cox regression analyses.

RESULTS

Eighteen of 160 patients (11%) who received P-XRT had LVI in their RP specimen. High Gleason score and seminal vesicle invasion were associated significantly with LVI. After a median follow-up of 8.3 years after RP, 16 patients with LVI had BCR after P-XRT, 9 of whom developed DM. The median time to BCR in patients with LVI was 2.6 years (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.8-5.4) compared with 7.8 years (95% CI, 6.8-10.3) in patients without LVI (P < .001). Multivariate analysis revealed an adjusted relative risk for LVI of 5.5 (P < .001). Other significant factors were Gleason score, undetectable post-RP serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, preradiotherapy serum PSA levels, and the interval from RP to P-XRT. LVI was the only significant factor associated with an increased risk of DM in univariate analysis (hazard ratio, 7.4; P < .001).

CONCLUSIONS

LVI was useful as a pathologic marker for reduced efficacy of P-XRT after RP in terms of increased risk of BCR and DM. Future studies will be needed to validate these findings.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Radiation Oncology, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16518811

Citation

Brooks, Joseph P., et al. "Lymphovascular Invasion in Prostate Cancer: Prognostic Significance in Patients Treated With Radiotherapy After Radical Prostatectomy." Cancer, vol. 106, no. 7, 2006, pp. 1521-6.
Brooks JP, Albert PS, O'Connell J, et al. Lymphovascular invasion in prostate cancer: prognostic significance in patients treated with radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Cancer. 2006;106(7):1521-6.
Brooks, J. P., Albert, P. S., O'Connell, J., McLeod, D. G., & Poggi, M. M. (2006). Lymphovascular invasion in prostate cancer: prognostic significance in patients treated with radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. Cancer, 106(7), 1521-6.
Brooks JP, et al. Lymphovascular Invasion in Prostate Cancer: Prognostic Significance in Patients Treated With Radiotherapy After Radical Prostatectomy. Cancer. 2006 Apr 1;106(7):1521-6. PubMed PMID: 16518811.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lymphovascular invasion in prostate cancer: prognostic significance in patients treated with radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy. AU - Brooks,Joseph P, AU - Albert,Paul S, AU - O'Connell,John, AU - McLeod,David G, AU - Poggi,Matthew M, PY - 2006/3/7/pubmed PY - 2006/4/28/medline PY - 2006/3/7/entrez SP - 1521 EP - 6 JF - Cancer JO - Cancer VL - 106 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: Lymphovascular invasion (LVI) is found in approximately 5% to 53% of specimens after radical prostatectomy (RP). Although LVI is associated with higher rates of recurrence after RP, its prognostic significance after postprostatectomy radiotherapy (P-XRT) is unclear. METHODS: The medical records of men who received P-XRT from 1991 to 2001 at 2 institutions were reviewed for the presence of LVI in RP specimens. Multiple patient variables were evaluated for their association with LVI using Fisher exact tests and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. The time to biochemical recurrence (BCR) and the time to distant metastases (DM) after RP were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier estimations, log-rank tests, and Cox regression analyses. RESULTS: Eighteen of 160 patients (11%) who received P-XRT had LVI in their RP specimen. High Gleason score and seminal vesicle invasion were associated significantly with LVI. After a median follow-up of 8.3 years after RP, 16 patients with LVI had BCR after P-XRT, 9 of whom developed DM. The median time to BCR in patients with LVI was 2.6 years (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.8-5.4) compared with 7.8 years (95% CI, 6.8-10.3) in patients without LVI (P < .001). Multivariate analysis revealed an adjusted relative risk for LVI of 5.5 (P < .001). Other significant factors were Gleason score, undetectable post-RP serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, preradiotherapy serum PSA levels, and the interval from RP to P-XRT. LVI was the only significant factor associated with an increased risk of DM in univariate analysis (hazard ratio, 7.4; P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: LVI was useful as a pathologic marker for reduced efficacy of P-XRT after RP in terms of increased risk of BCR and DM. Future studies will be needed to validate these findings. SN - 0008-543X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16518811/Lymphovascular_invasion_in_prostate_cancer:_prognostic_significance_in_patients_treated_with_radiotherapy_after_radical_prostatectomy_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.21774 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -