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VEGF 164 gene transfer by electroporation improves diabetic sensory neuropathy in mice.
J Gene Med. 2006 Jun; 8(6):773-81.JG

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Diabetic neuropathy is the most common cause of peripheral neuropathy and a serious complication of diabetes. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) stimulates angiogenesis and has neurotrophic and neuroprotective activities. To examine the efficiency of VEGF 164 electro-gene therapy for neuropathy, intramuscular VEGF 164 gene transfer by electroporation was performed to treat sensory neuropathy in diabetic mice.

METHODS

VEGF 164 was overexpressed in the tibial anterior (TA) muscles of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice with hypoalgesia, using a VEGF 164 plasmid injection with electroporation. From 2 weeks after electro-gene transfer, the nociceptive threshold was measured weekly using the paw-pressure test. The TA muscles, sciatic nerve, liver and spleen were histochemically examined at 4 weeks after electro-gene transfer.

RESULTS

Two weeks after electro-gene transfer into the bilateral TA muscles, the elevated nociceptive threshold was decreased to a normal level in all treated mice. Improvement of the hypoalgesia continued for 14 weeks. When the VEGF 164 plasmid was injected with electroporation into a unilateral TA muscle, recovery from hypoalgesia was observed in not only the ipsilateral hindpaw, but also the contralateral one, suggesting that VEGF circulates in the blood. No increase in the number of endoneurial vessels in the sciatic nerve was found in the VEGF 164 plasmid-electroporated mice.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings suggest that VEGF 164 electro-gene therapy completely recovered the sensory deficits, i.e. hypoalgesia, in the diabetic mice through mechanisms other than angiogenesis in the endoneurium of the peripheral nerve, and may be useful for treatment for diabetic sensory neuropathy in human subjects.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Neurology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Japan. tatsum@med.kawasaki-m.ac.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16518878

Citation

Murakami, Tatsufumi, et al. "VEGF 164 Gene Transfer By Electroporation Improves Diabetic Sensory Neuropathy in Mice." The Journal of Gene Medicine, vol. 8, no. 6, 2006, pp. 773-81.
Murakami T, Arai M, Sunada Y, et al. VEGF 164 gene transfer by electroporation improves diabetic sensory neuropathy in mice. J Gene Med. 2006;8(6):773-81.
Murakami, T., Arai, M., Sunada, Y., & Nakamura, A. (2006). VEGF 164 gene transfer by electroporation improves diabetic sensory neuropathy in mice. The Journal of Gene Medicine, 8(6), 773-81.
Murakami T, et al. VEGF 164 Gene Transfer By Electroporation Improves Diabetic Sensory Neuropathy in Mice. J Gene Med. 2006;8(6):773-81. PubMed PMID: 16518878.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - VEGF 164 gene transfer by electroporation improves diabetic sensory neuropathy in mice. AU - Murakami,Tatsufumi, AU - Arai,Makiko, AU - Sunada,Yoshihide, AU - Nakamura,Akihiro, PY - 2006/3/7/pubmed PY - 2006/7/20/medline PY - 2006/3/7/entrez SP - 773 EP - 81 JF - The journal of gene medicine JO - J Gene Med VL - 8 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Diabetic neuropathy is the most common cause of peripheral neuropathy and a serious complication of diabetes. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) stimulates angiogenesis and has neurotrophic and neuroprotective activities. To examine the efficiency of VEGF 164 electro-gene therapy for neuropathy, intramuscular VEGF 164 gene transfer by electroporation was performed to treat sensory neuropathy in diabetic mice. METHODS: VEGF 164 was overexpressed in the tibial anterior (TA) muscles of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice with hypoalgesia, using a VEGF 164 plasmid injection with electroporation. From 2 weeks after electro-gene transfer, the nociceptive threshold was measured weekly using the paw-pressure test. The TA muscles, sciatic nerve, liver and spleen were histochemically examined at 4 weeks after electro-gene transfer. RESULTS: Two weeks after electro-gene transfer into the bilateral TA muscles, the elevated nociceptive threshold was decreased to a normal level in all treated mice. Improvement of the hypoalgesia continued for 14 weeks. When the VEGF 164 plasmid was injected with electroporation into a unilateral TA muscle, recovery from hypoalgesia was observed in not only the ipsilateral hindpaw, but also the contralateral one, suggesting that VEGF circulates in the blood. No increase in the number of endoneurial vessels in the sciatic nerve was found in the VEGF 164 plasmid-electroporated mice. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that VEGF 164 electro-gene therapy completely recovered the sensory deficits, i.e. hypoalgesia, in the diabetic mice through mechanisms other than angiogenesis in the endoneurium of the peripheral nerve, and may be useful for treatment for diabetic sensory neuropathy in human subjects. SN - 1099-498X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16518878/VEGF_164_gene_transfer_by_electroporation_improves_diabetic_sensory_neuropathy_in_mice_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/jgm.893 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -