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Coffee, CYP1A2 genotype, and risk of myocardial infarction.
JAMA 2006; 295(10):1135-41JAMA

Abstract

CONTEXT

The association between coffee intake and risk of myocardial infarction (MI) remains controversial. Coffee is a major source of caffeine, which is metabolized by the polymorphic cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) enzyme. Individuals who are homozygous for the CYP1A2*1A allele are "rapid" caffeine metabolizers, whereas carriers of the variant CYP1A2*1F are "slow" caffeine metabolizers.

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether CYP1A2 genotype modifies the association between coffee consumption and risk of acute nonfatal MI.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS

Cases (n = 2014) with a first acute nonfatal MI and population-based controls (n = 2014) living in Costa Rica between 1994 and 2004, matched for age, sex, and area of residence, were genotyped by restriction fragment-length polymorphism polymerase chain reaction. A food frequency questionnaire was used to assess the intake of caffeinated coffee.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

Relative risk of nonfatal MI associated with coffee intake, calculated using unconditional logistic regression.

RESULTS

Fifty-five percent of cases (n = 1114) and 54% of controls (n = 1082) were carriers of the slow *1F allele. For carriers of the slow *1F allele, the multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of nonfatal MI associated with consuming less than 1, 1, 2 to 3, and 4 or more cups of coffee per day were 1.00 (reference), 0.99 (0.69-1.44), 1.36 (1.01-1.83), and 1.64 (1.14-2.34), respectively. Corresponding ORs (95% CIs) for individuals with the rapid *1A/*1A genotype were 1.00, 0.75 (0.51-1.12), 0.78 (0.56-1.09), and 0.99 (0.66-1.48) (P = .04 for gene x coffee interaction). For individuals younger than the median age of 59 years, the ORs (95% CIs) associated with consuming less than 1, 1, 2 to 3, or 4 or more cups of coffee per day were 1.00, 1.24 (0.71-2.18), 1.67 (1.08-2.60), and 2.33 (1.39-3.89), respectively, among carriers of the *1F allele. The corresponding ORs (95% CIs) for those with the *1A/*1A genotype were 1.00, 0.48 (0.26-0.87), 0.57 (0.35-0.95), and 0.83 (0.46-1.51).

CONCLUSION

Intake of coffee was associated with an increased risk of nonfatal MI only among individuals with slow caffeine metabolism, suggesting that caffeine plays a role in this association.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16522833

Citation

Cornelis, Marilyn C., et al. "Coffee, CYP1A2 Genotype, and Risk of Myocardial Infarction." JAMA, vol. 295, no. 10, 2006, pp. 1135-41.
Cornelis MC, El-Sohemy A, Kabagambe EK, et al. Coffee, CYP1A2 genotype, and risk of myocardial infarction. JAMA. 2006;295(10):1135-41.
Cornelis, M. C., El-Sohemy, A., Kabagambe, E. K., & Campos, H. (2006). Coffee, CYP1A2 genotype, and risk of myocardial infarction. JAMA, 295(10), pp. 1135-41.
Cornelis MC, et al. Coffee, CYP1A2 Genotype, and Risk of Myocardial Infarction. JAMA. 2006 Mar 8;295(10):1135-41. PubMed PMID: 16522833.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coffee, CYP1A2 genotype, and risk of myocardial infarction. AU - Cornelis,Marilyn C, AU - El-Sohemy,Ahmed, AU - Kabagambe,Edmond K, AU - Campos,Hannia, PY - 2006/3/9/pubmed PY - 2006/3/11/medline PY - 2006/3/9/entrez SP - 1135 EP - 41 JF - JAMA JO - JAMA VL - 295 IS - 10 N2 - CONTEXT: The association between coffee intake and risk of myocardial infarction (MI) remains controversial. Coffee is a major source of caffeine, which is metabolized by the polymorphic cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) enzyme. Individuals who are homozygous for the CYP1A2*1A allele are "rapid" caffeine metabolizers, whereas carriers of the variant CYP1A2*1F are "slow" caffeine metabolizers. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether CYP1A2 genotype modifies the association between coffee consumption and risk of acute nonfatal MI. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Cases (n = 2014) with a first acute nonfatal MI and population-based controls (n = 2014) living in Costa Rica between 1994 and 2004, matched for age, sex, and area of residence, were genotyped by restriction fragment-length polymorphism polymerase chain reaction. A food frequency questionnaire was used to assess the intake of caffeinated coffee. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Relative risk of nonfatal MI associated with coffee intake, calculated using unconditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Fifty-five percent of cases (n = 1114) and 54% of controls (n = 1082) were carriers of the slow *1F allele. For carriers of the slow *1F allele, the multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of nonfatal MI associated with consuming less than 1, 1, 2 to 3, and 4 or more cups of coffee per day were 1.00 (reference), 0.99 (0.69-1.44), 1.36 (1.01-1.83), and 1.64 (1.14-2.34), respectively. Corresponding ORs (95% CIs) for individuals with the rapid *1A/*1A genotype were 1.00, 0.75 (0.51-1.12), 0.78 (0.56-1.09), and 0.99 (0.66-1.48) (P = .04 for gene x coffee interaction). For individuals younger than the median age of 59 years, the ORs (95% CIs) associated with consuming less than 1, 1, 2 to 3, or 4 or more cups of coffee per day were 1.00, 1.24 (0.71-2.18), 1.67 (1.08-2.60), and 2.33 (1.39-3.89), respectively, among carriers of the *1F allele. The corresponding ORs (95% CIs) for those with the *1A/*1A genotype were 1.00, 0.48 (0.26-0.87), 0.57 (0.35-0.95), and 0.83 (0.46-1.51). CONCLUSION: Intake of coffee was associated with an increased risk of nonfatal MI only among individuals with slow caffeine metabolism, suggesting that caffeine plays a role in this association. SN - 1538-3598 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16522833/Coffee_CYP1A2_genotype_and_risk_of_myocardial_infarction_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/10.1001/jama.295.10.1135 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -