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Calcium and dairy intakes in relation to long-term weight gain in US men.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Mar; 83(3):559-66.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The role of calcium in the maintenance of body weight remains controversial.

OBJECTIVE

We investigated the association between calcium and dairy intakes and 12-y weight change in US men.

DESIGN

This study was conducted with the use of data from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, a prospective cohort of men aged 40-75 y in 1986. Data on lifestyle factors and diet were updated biennially with self-administered questionnaires. The participants reported their body weight in 1986 and in 1998. The outcome in our study was 12-y weight change. We used multivariate linear regression to examine how baseline calcium intake (n = 23,504) and change in calcium intake (n = 19,615) were associated with weight change. Because dairy foods are the predominant source of calcium in the diet, we also evaluated a similar association with dairy intake.

RESULTS

In a multivariate analysis with adjustment for potential confounders, baseline or change in intake of total calcium was not significantly associated with weight change. In addition, we did not find any association with dietary, dairy, or supplemental calcium intake when evaluated separately. The men with the largest increase in total dairy intake gained slightly more weight than did the men who decreased intake the most (3.14 compared with 2.57 kg; P for trend = 0.001). This association was primarily due to an increase in high-fat dairy intake. Low-fat dairy intake was not significantly associated with weight change.

CONCLUSION

Our data do not support the hypothesis that an increase in calcium intake or dairy consumption is associated with lower long-term weight gain in men.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA. srajpath@aecom.yu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16522901

Citation

Rajpathak, Swapnil N., et al. "Calcium and Dairy Intakes in Relation to Long-term Weight Gain in US Men." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 83, no. 3, 2006, pp. 559-66.
Rajpathak SN, Rimm EB, Rosner B, et al. Calcium and dairy intakes in relation to long-term weight gain in US men. Am J Clin Nutr. 2006;83(3):559-66.
Rajpathak, S. N., Rimm, E. B., Rosner, B., Willett, W. C., & Hu, F. B. (2006). Calcium and dairy intakes in relation to long-term weight gain in US men. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 83(3), 559-66.
Rajpathak SN, et al. Calcium and Dairy Intakes in Relation to Long-term Weight Gain in US Men. Am J Clin Nutr. 2006;83(3):559-66. PubMed PMID: 16522901.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Calcium and dairy intakes in relation to long-term weight gain in US men. AU - Rajpathak,Swapnil N, AU - Rimm,Eric B, AU - Rosner,Bernard, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Hu,Frank B, PY - 2006/3/9/pubmed PY - 2006/4/12/medline PY - 2006/3/9/entrez SP - 559 EP - 66 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 83 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: The role of calcium in the maintenance of body weight remains controversial. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the association between calcium and dairy intakes and 12-y weight change in US men. DESIGN: This study was conducted with the use of data from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, a prospective cohort of men aged 40-75 y in 1986. Data on lifestyle factors and diet were updated biennially with self-administered questionnaires. The participants reported their body weight in 1986 and in 1998. The outcome in our study was 12-y weight change. We used multivariate linear regression to examine how baseline calcium intake (n = 23,504) and change in calcium intake (n = 19,615) were associated with weight change. Because dairy foods are the predominant source of calcium in the diet, we also evaluated a similar association with dairy intake. RESULTS: In a multivariate analysis with adjustment for potential confounders, baseline or change in intake of total calcium was not significantly associated with weight change. In addition, we did not find any association with dietary, dairy, or supplemental calcium intake when evaluated separately. The men with the largest increase in total dairy intake gained slightly more weight than did the men who decreased intake the most (3.14 compared with 2.57 kg; P for trend = 0.001). This association was primarily due to an increase in high-fat dairy intake. Low-fat dairy intake was not significantly associated with weight change. CONCLUSION: Our data do not support the hypothesis that an increase in calcium intake or dairy consumption is associated with lower long-term weight gain in men. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16522901/Calcium_and_dairy_intakes_in_relation_to_long_term_weight_gain_in_US_men_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn.83.3.559 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -