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Assessment of the longer-term effects of a dietary portfolio of cholesterol-lowering foods in hypercholesterolemia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Cholesterol-lowering foods may be more effective when consumed as combinations rather than as single foods.

OBJECTIVES

Our aims were to determine the effectiveness of consuming a combination of cholesterol-lowering foods (dietary portfolio) under real-world conditions and to compare these results with published data from the same participants who had undergone 4-wk metabolic studies to compare the same dietary portfolio with the effects of a statin.

DESIGN

For 12 mo, 66 hyperlipidemic participants were prescribed diets high in plant sterols (1.0 g/1000 kcal), soy protein (22.5 g/1000 kcal), viscous fibers (10 g/1000 kcal), and almonds (23 g/1000 kcal). Fifty-five participants completed the 1-y study. The 1-y data were also compared with published results on 29 of the participants who had also undergone separate 1-mo metabolic trials of a diet and a statin.

RESULTS

At 3 mo and 1 y, mean (+/-SE) LDL-cholesterol reductions appeared stable at 14.0 +/- 1.6% (P < 0.001) and 12.8 +/- 2.0% (P < 0.001), respectively (n = 66). These reductions were less than those observed after the 1-mo metabolic diet and statin trials. Nevertheless, 31.8% of the participants (n = 21 of 66) had LDL-cholesterol reductions of >20% at 1 y (x +/- SE: -29.7 +/- 1.6%). The LDL-cholesterol reductions in this group were not significantly different from those seen after their respective metabolically controlled portfolio or statin treatments. A correlation was found between total dietary adherence and LDL-cholesterol change (r = -0.42, P < 0.001). Only 2 of the 26 participants with <55% compliance achieved LDL-cholesterol reductions >20% at 1 y.

CONCLUSIONS

More than 30% of motivated participants who ate the dietary portfolio of cholesterol-lowering foods under real-world conditions were able to lower LDL-cholesterol concentrations >20%, which was not significantly different from their response to a first-generation statin taken under metabolically controlled conditions.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Center, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

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    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Anticholesteremic Agents
    Cholesterol, Dietary
    Cholesterol, LDL
    Combined Modality Therapy
    Dietary Fiber
    Female
    Humans
    Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
    Hypercholesterolemia
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Patient Compliance
    Phytosterols
    Prunus
    Soybean Proteins
    Treatment Outcome

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16522904

    Citation

    Jenkins, David J A., et al. "Assessment of the Longer-term Effects of a Dietary Portfolio of Cholesterol-lowering Foods in Hypercholesterolemia." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 83, no. 3, 2006, pp. 582-91.
    Jenkins DJ, Kendall CW, Faulkner DA, et al. Assessment of the longer-term effects of a dietary portfolio of cholesterol-lowering foods in hypercholesterolemia. Am J Clin Nutr. 2006;83(3):582-91.
    Jenkins, D. J., Kendall, C. W., Faulkner, D. A., Nguyen, T., Kemp, T., Marchie, A., ... Singer, W. (2006). Assessment of the longer-term effects of a dietary portfolio of cholesterol-lowering foods in hypercholesterolemia. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 83(3), pp. 582-91.
    Jenkins DJ, et al. Assessment of the Longer-term Effects of a Dietary Portfolio of Cholesterol-lowering Foods in Hypercholesterolemia. Am J Clin Nutr. 2006;83(3):582-91. PubMed PMID: 16522904.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Assessment of the longer-term effects of a dietary portfolio of cholesterol-lowering foods in hypercholesterolemia. AU - Jenkins,David J A, AU - Kendall,Cyril W C, AU - Faulkner,Dorothea A, AU - Nguyen,Tri, AU - Kemp,Thomas, AU - Marchie,Augustine, AU - Wong,Julia M W, AU - de Souza,Russell, AU - Emam,Azadeh, AU - Vidgen,Edward, AU - Trautwein,Elke A, AU - Lapsley,Karen G, AU - Holmes,Candice, AU - Josse,Robert G, AU - Leiter,Lawrence A, AU - Connelly,Philip W, AU - Singer,William, PY - 2006/3/9/pubmed PY - 2006/4/12/medline PY - 2006/3/9/entrez SP - 582 EP - 91 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 83 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Cholesterol-lowering foods may be more effective when consumed as combinations rather than as single foods. OBJECTIVES: Our aims were to determine the effectiveness of consuming a combination of cholesterol-lowering foods (dietary portfolio) under real-world conditions and to compare these results with published data from the same participants who had undergone 4-wk metabolic studies to compare the same dietary portfolio with the effects of a statin. DESIGN: For 12 mo, 66 hyperlipidemic participants were prescribed diets high in plant sterols (1.0 g/1000 kcal), soy protein (22.5 g/1000 kcal), viscous fibers (10 g/1000 kcal), and almonds (23 g/1000 kcal). Fifty-five participants completed the 1-y study. The 1-y data were also compared with published results on 29 of the participants who had also undergone separate 1-mo metabolic trials of a diet and a statin. RESULTS: At 3 mo and 1 y, mean (+/-SE) LDL-cholesterol reductions appeared stable at 14.0 +/- 1.6% (P < 0.001) and 12.8 +/- 2.0% (P < 0.001), respectively (n = 66). These reductions were less than those observed after the 1-mo metabolic diet and statin trials. Nevertheless, 31.8% of the participants (n = 21 of 66) had LDL-cholesterol reductions of >20% at 1 y (x +/- SE: -29.7 +/- 1.6%). The LDL-cholesterol reductions in this group were not significantly different from those seen after their respective metabolically controlled portfolio or statin treatments. A correlation was found between total dietary adherence and LDL-cholesterol change (r = -0.42, P < 0.001). Only 2 of the 26 participants with <55% compliance achieved LDL-cholesterol reductions >20% at 1 y. CONCLUSIONS: More than 30% of motivated participants who ate the dietary portfolio of cholesterol-lowering foods under real-world conditions were able to lower LDL-cholesterol concentrations >20%, which was not significantly different from their response to a first-generation statin taken under metabolically controlled conditions. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16522904/Assessment_of_the_longer_term_effects_of_a_dietary_portfolio_of_cholesterol_lowering_foods_in_hypercholesterolemia_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn.83.3.582 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -