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Iron status and food matrix strongly affect the relative bioavailability of ferric pyrophosphate in humans.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Mar; 83(3):632-8.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although ferric pyrophosphate is a promising compound for iron fortification of foods, few data are available on the effect of food matrices, processing, and ascorbic acid on its bioavailability.

OBJECTIVE

We compared the relative bioavailability (RBV) of ferrous sulfate in an experimental form of micronized dispersible ferric pyrophosphate (MDFP) in a wheat-milk infant cereal given with and without ascorbic acid with the RBV of MDFP from a processed and unprocessed rice meal.

DESIGN

A crossover design was used to measure iron absorption in young women (n = 26) from test meals fortified with isotopically labeled [57Fe]-MDFP and [58Fe]-ferrous sulfate, based on erythrocyte incorporation of stable isotope labels 14 d later.

RESULTS

Geometric mean iron absorption from the wheat-based meal fortified with MDFP was 2.0% and that from the meal fortified with ferrous sulfate was 3.2% (RBV = 62). The addition of ascorbic acid at a molar ratio of 4:1 to iron increased iron absorption from MDFP to 5.8% and that from ferrous sulfate to 14.8% (RBV = 39). In the rice meals, mean iron absorption from MDFP added to the rice at the time of feeding was 1.7%, and that from ferrous sulfate was 11.6% (RBV = 15). The mean iron absorption from MDFP extruded into artificial rice grains was 3.0% and that from ferrous sulfate in unprocessed rice was 12.6% (RBV = 24). Sixteen of 26 subjects were iron deficient. Iron status was a highly significant predictor of the RBV of MDFP (P < 0.001).

CONCLUSION

RBV of the experimental MDFP varied markedly with food matrix and iron status. Assigning a single RBV value to poorly soluble compounds may be of limited value in evaluating their suitability for food fortification.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Human Nutrition Laboratory, Institute of Food Science and Nutrition, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zürich, Switzerland. diego.moretti@ilw.agrl.ethz.chNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16522911

Citation

Moretti, Diego, et al. "Iron Status and Food Matrix Strongly Affect the Relative Bioavailability of Ferric Pyrophosphate in Humans." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 83, no. 3, 2006, pp. 632-8.
Moretti D, Zimmermann MB, Wegmüller R, et al. Iron status and food matrix strongly affect the relative bioavailability of ferric pyrophosphate in humans. Am J Clin Nutr. 2006;83(3):632-8.
Moretti, D., Zimmermann, M. B., Wegmüller, R., Walczyk, T., Zeder, C., & Hurrell, R. F. (2006). Iron status and food matrix strongly affect the relative bioavailability of ferric pyrophosphate in humans. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 83(3), 632-8.
Moretti D, et al. Iron Status and Food Matrix Strongly Affect the Relative Bioavailability of Ferric Pyrophosphate in Humans. Am J Clin Nutr. 2006;83(3):632-8. PubMed PMID: 16522911.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Iron status and food matrix strongly affect the relative bioavailability of ferric pyrophosphate in humans. AU - Moretti,Diego, AU - Zimmermann,Michael B, AU - Wegmüller,Rita, AU - Walczyk,Thomas, AU - Zeder,Christophe, AU - Hurrell,Richard F, PY - 2006/3/9/pubmed PY - 2006/4/12/medline PY - 2006/3/9/entrez SP - 632 EP - 8 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 83 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although ferric pyrophosphate is a promising compound for iron fortification of foods, few data are available on the effect of food matrices, processing, and ascorbic acid on its bioavailability. OBJECTIVE: We compared the relative bioavailability (RBV) of ferrous sulfate in an experimental form of micronized dispersible ferric pyrophosphate (MDFP) in a wheat-milk infant cereal given with and without ascorbic acid with the RBV of MDFP from a processed and unprocessed rice meal. DESIGN: A crossover design was used to measure iron absorption in young women (n = 26) from test meals fortified with isotopically labeled [57Fe]-MDFP and [58Fe]-ferrous sulfate, based on erythrocyte incorporation of stable isotope labels 14 d later. RESULTS: Geometric mean iron absorption from the wheat-based meal fortified with MDFP was 2.0% and that from the meal fortified with ferrous sulfate was 3.2% (RBV = 62). The addition of ascorbic acid at a molar ratio of 4:1 to iron increased iron absorption from MDFP to 5.8% and that from ferrous sulfate to 14.8% (RBV = 39). In the rice meals, mean iron absorption from MDFP added to the rice at the time of feeding was 1.7%, and that from ferrous sulfate was 11.6% (RBV = 15). The mean iron absorption from MDFP extruded into artificial rice grains was 3.0% and that from ferrous sulfate in unprocessed rice was 12.6% (RBV = 24). Sixteen of 26 subjects were iron deficient. Iron status was a highly significant predictor of the RBV of MDFP (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: RBV of the experimental MDFP varied markedly with food matrix and iron status. Assigning a single RBV value to poorly soluble compounds may be of limited value in evaluating their suitability for food fortification. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16522911/Iron_status_and_food_matrix_strongly_affect_the_relative_bioavailability_of_ferric_pyrophosphate_in_humans_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn.83.3.632 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -